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Do People’s World Views Matter? The Why and How.

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Personality & Social Psychology, October 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (56th percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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13 Dimensions

Readers on

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1 Mendeley
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Title
Do People’s World Views Matter? The Why and How.
Published in
Journal of Personality & Social Psychology, October 2015
DOI 10.1037/pspp0000061
Pubmed ID
Authors

Chen, Sylvia Xiaohua, Lam, Ben C P, Wu, Wesley C H, Ng, Jacky C K, Buchtel, Emma E, Guan, Yanjun, Deng, Hong, Sylvia Xiaohua Chen, Ben C. P. Lam, Wesley C. H. Wu, Jacky C. K. Ng, Emma E. Buchtel, Yanjun Guan, Hong Deng

Abstract

Over the past decades, personality and social psychologists have extensively investigated the role of self-views in individual functioning. Research on world views, however, has been less well studied due to overly specific conceptualizations, and little research about how and why they impact life outcomes. To answer why and how world views matter, we conducted 7 studies to examine the functions, antecedents, and consequences of generalized beliefs about the world, operationalized as social axioms (Leung et al., 2002). This research focused on 2 axiom factors, namely, social cynicism and reward for application. These axioms were found to explain individual differences in self-views over and above personality traits in Hong Kong and U.S. samples (Study 1) and to explain cultural differences in self-views in addition to self-construals among Mainland Chinese, Hong Kong Chinese, East Asian Canadians, and European Canadians (Study 2). Endorsement of social axioms by participants, their parents, and close friends was collected from Mainland China, Hong Kong, and Canada to infer parental and peer influences on world views (Study 3). World views affected psychological well-being through the mediation of positive self-views across 3 age groups, including children, adolescents, and young adults (Study 4) and over time (Study 5). The mediation of negative self-views was through comparative self-criticism rather than internalized self-criticism (Study 6). Holistic thinking moderated the effect of social cynicism on self-views and psychological well-being (Study 7). These results converge to show that world views as a distal force and self-views as a proximal force matter in people's subjective evaluation of their lives. (PsycINFO Database Record

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 1 Mendeley reader of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 400%
Hong Kong 1 100%
Austria 1 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 16 1600%
Professor > Associate Professor 6 600%
Professor 5 500%
Student > Bachelor 3 300%
Researcher 3 300%
Other 13 1300%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 26 2600%
Social Sciences 7 700%
Unspecified 6 600%
Business, Management and Accounting 4 400%
Neuroscience 2 200%
Other 1 100%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 July 2017.
All research outputs
#6,401,623
of 11,419,765 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Personality & Social Psychology
#3,559
of 6,109 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#103,935
of 246,247 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Personality & Social Psychology
#31
of 37 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,419,765 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,109 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.9. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 246,247 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 37 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.