↓ Skip to main content

The effects of exercise referral schemes in the United Kingdom in those with cardiovascular, mental health, and musculoskeletal disorders: a preliminary systematic review

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, August 2018
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (86th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (57th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
26 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
20 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
67 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
The effects of exercise referral schemes in the United Kingdom in those with cardiovascular, mental health, and musculoskeletal disorders: a preliminary systematic review
Published in
BMC Public Health, August 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12889-018-5868-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nikita Rowley, Steve Mann, James Steele, Elizabeth Horton, Alfonso Jimenez

Abstract

Exercise referral schemes within clinical populations may offer benefits for inactive and sedentary individuals, and improve and aid treatment of specific health disorders. This systematic review aims to provide an overview, and examine the impact, of exercise referral schemes in patients with cardiovascular, mental health, and musculoskeletal disorders. This review focuses on populations within the United Kingdom (UK) only, with an aim to inform national exercise referral policies and guidelines. Data was collected from specific sources using validated methodology through PRISMA. Systematic searches were performed using Locate, PubMed, Scopus and Pro Quest: Public Health databases. Thirteen studies met inclusion criteria set for each sub group. This included that all studies aimed to prevent, observe, or decrease ill-health relating to the disorder, participants over the age of sixteen, and health disorders and outcomes were reviewed. All studies were conducted in the UK only. In the 13 articles, a variety of modes and types of exercise were utilised. One-to-one supervised exercise sessions based in a gym environment were most frequently employed. Results showed that longer length schemes (20+ weeks) produced better health outcomes, and had higher adherence to physical activity prescribed, than those of shorter length (8-12 weeks). In patients referred with cardiovascular disorders, cardiovascular-related measures showed significant decreases including blood pressure. Schemes increased physical activity levels over the length of scheme for all disorders. Longer length schemes (20+ weeks) improved adherence to physical activity prescribed over the course of the scheme, and could support longer term exercise adherence upon completion, however additional research on larger samples should examine this further. An implication is that schemes currently recommended in guidelines do not tailor programmes to support long term adherence to exercise, which must be addressed. There is currently a lack of research examining programmes tailored to suit the individual's health conditions thus further research might allow providers to tailor delivery and build upon policy recommendations in the UK.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 26 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 67 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 67 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 10 15%
Researcher 8 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 12%
Student > Master 7 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 7%
Other 11 16%
Unknown 18 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 10%
Psychology 7 10%
Sports and Recreations 7 10%
Social Sciences 4 6%
Other 10 15%
Unknown 21 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 16. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 November 2019.
All research outputs
#1,326,908
of 16,213,778 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#1,491
of 11,142 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#37,279
of 280,761 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#3
of 7 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,213,778 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 11,142 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 280,761 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 7 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 4 of them.