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Natalizumab for induction of remission in Crohn's disease

Overview of attention for article published in Cochrane database of systematic reviews, August 2018
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (71st percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters
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1 Wikipedia page

Citations

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6 Dimensions

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97 Mendeley
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Title
Natalizumab for induction of remission in Crohn's disease
Published in
Cochrane database of systematic reviews, August 2018
DOI 10.1002/14651858.cd006097.pub3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Seana ML Nelson, Tran M Nguyen, John WD McDonald, John K MacDonald

Abstract

This systematic review update summarizes the current evidence on the use of natalizumab for induction of remission in Crohn's disease (CD). To determine the efficacy and safety of natalizumab for induction of remission in CD. We searched MEDLINE, Embase, CENTRAL, the Cochrane IBD Group Specialized Trials Register, and clinicaltrials.gov from inception to 10 May 2018. We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing natalizumab to a placebo or control therapy for induction of remission in CD. Two authors independently screened studies, extracted data and assessed methodological quality using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. The primary outcome was failure to enter clinical remission. Secondary outcomes included clinical response, mean change in Crohn's Disease Activity Index (CDAI), adverse events (AEs), withdrawal due to AEs and serious AEs. For dichotomous outcomes, we calculated the risk ratio (RR) and 95% confidence interval (95% CI). For continuous outcomes we calculated the mean difference (MD) and 95% CI. Data were pooled for meta-analysis when the interventions, patient groups and outcomes were sufficiently similar (determined by consensus). We used GRADE to assess the overall quality of the evidence. A total of five RCTs (1771 participants) were included. Four studies (1692 participants) compared one, two or three infusions of natalizumab (300 mg or 3 mg/kg or 6mg/kg) to placebo. One study (79 participants) compared three infusions of natalizumab (300 mg) and infliximab (5 mg/kg) to infliximab and placebo. Four studies were rated as low risk of bias. One study was rated as unclear risk of bias for selective reporting.One, two and three infusions of natalizumab were superior to placebo for induction of remission and clinical response. Infusions were administered at weeks zero, four and eight. After one infusion, 76% (849/1117) of natalizumab participants failed to enter remission at 4 weeks compared to 83% (411/494) of placebo participants (RR 0.91, 95% CI 0.86 to 0.96, 3 studies, GRADE high quality). At 4 weeks, the RR for clinical response was 0.78 (95% CI 0.66 to 0.92, 3 studies, 1611 participants, GRADE moderate quality). After two infusions, after 8 weeks, 66% (693/1049) of natalizumab participants failed to enter remission compared to 77% (382/494) of placebo participants (RR 0.85, 95% CI 0.76 to 0.95; 3 studies, GRADE moderate quality). At 8 weeks, the RR for clinical response was 0.73 (95% CI 0.58 to 0.91, 3 studies, 1543 participants, GRADE low quality). After three infusions, at 12 weeks, 61% (596/983) of natalizumab participants failed to enter remission compared to 73% (313/431) of placebo participants (RR 0.85, 95% CI 0.78 to 0.92, 2 studies, GRADE high quality). At 12 weeks, the RR for clinical response was 0.76 (95% CI 0.67 to 0.86, 2 studies, 1414 participants, GRADE high quality). One study (507 participants) reported on change in CADI from baseline. Natalizumab participants had a larger drop in mean CDAI scores than placebo participants at 4, 8 and 12 weeks.The rates of AEs, withdrawals due to AEs and serious AEs were similar across groups at 4, 8 and 12 weeks. After one infusion, 74% (50/68) of natalizumab participants experienced an AE compared to 81% (51/63) of placebo participants (RR 0.91, 95% CI 0.75 to 1.09, GRADE moderate quality). Withdrawal due to an AE occurred in 1% (1/68) of natalizumab participants and 3% of placebo participants (RR 0.46, 95% CI 0.04 to 4.98, GRADE low quality). SAEs occurred in 10% (7/68) of natalizumab participants compared to 11% (7/63) of placebo participants (RR 0.93, 95% CI 0.34 to 2.49, GRADE low quality). After two infusions, 86% (57/66) of natalizumab participants experienced an AE compared to 81% (51/63) of placebo participants (RR 1.07, 95% CI 0.92 to 1.24, GRADE moderate quality). Withdrawal due to an AE occurred in 3% (2/66) natalizumab participants compared to 3% (2/63) placebo participants (RR 0.95, 95% CI 0.14 to 6.57, GRADE low quality). SAEs occurred in 9% (6/66) of natalizumab participants and 11% (7/63) of placebo participants (RR 0.82, 95% CI 0.29 to 2.30, GRADE low quality). After three infusions, 86% (848/984) of natalizumab participants experienced an AE compared to 83% (359/431) placebo participants (RR 1.03, 95% CI 0.98 to 1.08, GRADE high quality). Withdrawals due to AEs occurred in 8% (82/984) of natalizumab participants compared to 10% (45/431) of placebo participants (RR 0.86, 95% CI 0.59 to 1.26, GRADE moderate quality). SAEs occurred in 7% (65/983) of natalizumab participants and 8% (36/431) of placebo participants (RR 0.76. 95% CI 0.37 to 1.56, GRADE low quality). Adverse events included headache, nausea, nasopharyngitis, abdominal pain, fatigue, vomiting, and exacerbation of CD.The study comparing combination therapy with natalizumab and infliximab to infliximab and placebo demonstrated similar remission rates at 10 weeks. Sixty-four per cent (33/52) of participants assigned to natalizumab and infliximab failed to achieve remission compared to 70% (19/27) assigned to placebo and infliximab (RR 0.90, 95% CI 0.65 to 1.24, GRADE moderate quality). The rates of AEs (moderate quality evidence), withdrawals due to AEs (low quality evidence) and serious AEs (low quality evidence) were similar across groups at 10 weeks. Adverse events included headache, exacerbation of CD, nausea, and nasopharyngitis.Natalizumab is associated with the development of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) resulting in some patient deaths. There are currently no tests which can reliably predict those at risk of developing PML. High quality data suggest that natalizumab is effective for induction of clinical remission and response in some patients with moderately to severely active CD. However, none of the included studies had the power to detect rare but serious adverse events such as PML. Due to the association with PML, and the availability of alternative agents that are not associated with PML, natalizumab is not likely to be used in patients who fail currently available medical therapy. The use of natalizumab in select patients (e.g. patients allergic to different biologics) needs to be carefully considered against the potential risk of developing PML. Futher studies of natalizumab are not likely to be done.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 97 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 1%
United Kingdom 1 1%
Brazil 1 1%
Belgium 1 1%
Unknown 93 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 15%
Researcher 14 14%
Student > Master 14 14%
Student > Bachelor 14 14%
Unspecified 10 10%
Other 30 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 40 41%
Unspecified 17 18%
Nursing and Health Professions 14 14%
Social Sciences 8 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 4%
Other 14 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 June 2019.
All research outputs
#3,016,492
of 13,459,972 outputs
Outputs from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#5,575
of 10,601 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#76,958
of 268,532 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#122
of 184 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,459,972 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 77th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 10,601 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 21.0. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,532 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 184 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.