↓ Skip to main content

Sodium bicarbonate supplementation prevents skilled tennis performance decline after a simulated match

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, January 2010
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (77th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
1 blog
twitter
12 tweeters
facebook
5 Facebook pages
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
28 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
112 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Sodium bicarbonate supplementation prevents skilled tennis performance decline after a simulated match
Published in
Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, January 2010
DOI 10.1186/1550-2783-7-33
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ching-Lin Wu, Mu-Chin Shih, Chia-Cheng Yang, Ming-Hsiang Huang, Chen-Kang Chang

Abstract

The supplementation of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) could increase performance or delay fatigue in intermittent high-intensity exercise. Prolonged tennis matches result in fatigue, which impairs skilled performance. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of NaHCO3 supplementation on skilled tennis performance after a simulated match. Nine male college tennis players were recruited for this randomized cross-over, placebo-controlled, double-blind study. The participants consumed NaHCO3 (0.3 g. kg-1) or NaCl (0.209 g. kg-1) before the trial. An additional supplementation of 0.1 g. kg-1 NaHCO3 or 0.07 g. kg-1 NaCl was ingested after the third game in the simulated match. The Loughborough Tennis Skill Test was performed before and after the simulated match. Post-match [HCO3-] and base excess were significantly higher in the bicarbonate trial than those in the placebo trial. Blood [lactate] was significantly increased in the placebo (pre: 1.22 ± 0.54; post: 2.17 ± 1.46 mM) and bicarbonate (pre: 1.23 ± 0.41; post: 3.21 ± 1.89 mM) trials. The match-induced change in blood [lactate] was significantly higher in the bicarbonate trial. Blood pH remained unchanged in the placebo trial (pre: 7.37 ± 0.32; post: 7.37 ± 0.14) but was significantly increased in the bicarbonate trial (pre: 7.37 ± 0.26; post: 7.45 ± 0.63), indicating a more alkaline environment. The service and forehand ground stroke consistency scores were declined significantly after the simulated match in the placebo trial, while they were maintained in the bicarbonate trial. The match-induced declines in the consistency scores were significantly larger in the placebo trial than those in the bicarbonate trial. This study suggested that NaHCO3 supplementation could prevent the decline in skilled tennis performance after a simulated match.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 12 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 112 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Unknown 110 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 34 30%
Student > Master 25 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 12%
Other 6 5%
Lecturer 5 4%
Other 20 18%
Unknown 9 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 47 42%
Medicine and Dentistry 19 17%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 6%
Other 10 9%
Unknown 12 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 30. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 May 2019.
All research outputs
#792,681
of 17,130,659 outputs
Outputs from Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition
#238
of 788 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#6,947
of 219,559 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition
#15
of 62 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,130,659 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 788 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 49.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 219,559 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 62 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.