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Towards understanding resprouting at the global scale

Overview of attention for article published in New Phytologist, October 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
3 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
7 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
146 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
283 Mendeley
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Title
Towards understanding resprouting at the global scale
Published in
New Phytologist, October 2015
DOI 10.1111/nph.13644
Pubmed ID
Authors

Juli G. Pausas, R. Brandon Pratt, Jon E. Keeley, Anna L. Jacobsen, Aaron R. Ramirez, Alberto Vilagrosa, Susana Paula, Iolana N. Kaneakua‐Pia, Stephen D. Davis

Abstract

Understanding and predicting plant response to disturbance is of paramount importance in our changing world. Resprouting ability is often considered a simple qualitative trait and used in many ecological studies. Our aim is to show some of the complexities of resprouting while highlighting cautions that need be taken in using resprouting ability to predict vegetation responses across disturbance types and biomes. There are marked differences in resprouting depending on the disturbance type, and fire is often the most severe disturbance because it includes both defoliation and lethal temperatures. In the Mediterranean biome, there are differences in functional strategies to cope with water deficit between resprouters (dehydration avoiders) and nonresprouters (dehydration tolerators); however, there is little research to unambiguously extrapolate these results to other biomes. Furthermore, predictions of vegetation responses to changes in disturbance regimes require consideration not only of resprouting, but also other relevant traits (e.g. seeding, bark thickness) and the different correlations among traits observed in different biomes; models lacking these details would behave poorly at the global scale. Overall, the lessons learned from a given disturbance regime and biome (e.g. crown-fire Mediterranean ecosystems) can guide research in other ecosystems but should not be extrapolated at the global scale.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 283 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 1%
Spain 3 1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Turkey 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Unknown 273 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 58 20%
Researcher 54 19%
Student > Master 47 17%
Student > Bachelor 24 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 15 5%
Other 50 18%
Unknown 35 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 106 37%
Environmental Science 102 36%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 10 4%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 <1%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 <1%
Other 9 3%
Unknown 52 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 35. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 March 2019.
All research outputs
#540,442
of 14,443,874 outputs
Outputs from New Phytologist
#388
of 5,966 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#13,493
of 253,142 outputs
Outputs of similar age from New Phytologist
#8
of 122 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,443,874 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,966 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 253,142 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 122 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.