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How Should Physicians Care for Dying Patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis?

Overview of attention for article published in AMA Journal of Ethics, August 2018
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17 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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4 Dimensions

Readers on

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24 Mendeley
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Title
How Should Physicians Care for Dying Patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis?
Published in
AMA Journal of Ethics, August 2018
DOI 10.1001/amajethics.2018.690
Pubmed ID
Abstract

We discuss physician aid in dying, euthanasia, and other dimensions of palliative care decision making and define relevant terms raised by this case of a dying patient with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in Washington State who is unable to self-administer a lethal prescription. We then present a concrete framework that clinicians can directly apply when faced with difficult cases such as this one. We outline how exploring motivations, obtaining informed consent, defining goals, and examining alternatives can help guide physicians like the one in this case. We conclude by summarizing one way in which physicians might balance these issues while still remaining within the constraints of the law.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 17 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 24 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 24 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 4 17%
Student > Bachelor 3 13%
Student > Postgraduate 2 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 4%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 4%
Other 3 13%
Unknown 10 42%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 4 17%
Psychology 3 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 13%
Arts and Humanities 1 4%
Social Sciences 1 4%
Other 2 8%
Unknown 10 42%