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Aerial-hawking bats adjust their use of space to the lunar cycle

Overview of attention for article published in Movement Ecology, August 2018
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (72nd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
11 tweeters

Citations

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14 Dimensions

Readers on

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62 Mendeley
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Title
Aerial-hawking bats adjust their use of space to the lunar cycle
Published in
Movement Ecology, August 2018
DOI 10.1186/s40462-018-0131-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Manuel Roeleke, Tobias Teige, Uwe Hoffmeister, Friederike Klingler, Christian C. Voigt

Abstract

Animals change their habitat use in response to spatio-temporal fluctuation of resources. Some resources may vary periodically according to the moonphase. Yet it is poorly documented how animals, particularly nocturnal mammals, adjust their use of space in response to the moonphase.Here, we asked if an obligate nocturnal mammal, the aerial-hawking common noctule bat (Nyctalus noctula), adjusts its 3-dimensional flight behaviour and habitat use to the lunar period. Using miniaturized GPS loggers, we recorded 3-dimensional flight tracks of N. noctula and related these to a canopy height model derived from aerial laser scans to investigate whether bats adjust forest strata use to moonlight intensities. Noctules frequently foraged above the canopy of coniferous forest at low moonlight intensities, but switched to using open grasslands and arable fields in nights with high moonlight intensities. During the few occasions when noctules used the forest during moonlit nights, they mostly restricted their use of space to flying below the canopy level. The median overall flight altitude of N. noctula equalled 13 ± 16 m but reached up to 71 m above ground (97.5% quantile). Our findings argue against general lunar phobic behaviour of aerial-hawking bats. We suggest that the preferred use of open fields around full moon may be a strategy of noctules to increase the success of hunting airborne insects at night. Specifically, the adjustment in use of space may allow bats to hunt for insects that emerge and disperse over open fields during bright moonlight.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 11 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 62 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 62 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 26%
Researcher 10 16%
Student > Master 10 16%
Other 6 10%
Student > Bachelor 4 6%
Other 7 11%
Unknown 9 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 24 39%
Environmental Science 18 29%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 3%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 2%
Unspecified 1 2%
Other 1 2%
Unknown 15 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 December 2019.
All research outputs
#2,903,709
of 15,211,297 outputs
Outputs from Movement Ecology
#87
of 192 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#76,057
of 277,401 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Movement Ecology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,211,297 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 80th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 192 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 18.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 277,401 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them