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International meeting on sarcoptic mange in wildlife, June 2018, Blacksburg, Virginia, USA

Overview of attention for article published in Parasites & Vectors, August 2018
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (84th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
18 tweeters

Citations

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6 Dimensions

Readers on

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35 Mendeley
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Title
International meeting on sarcoptic mange in wildlife, June 2018, Blacksburg, Virginia, USA
Published in
Parasites & Vectors, August 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13071-018-3015-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Francisca Astorga, Scott Carver, Emily S. Almberg, Giovane R. Sousa, Kimberly Wingfield, Kevin D. Niedringhaus, Peach Van Wick, Luca Rossi, Yue Xie, Paul Cross, Samer Angelone, Christian Gortázar, Luis E. Escobar

Abstract

Sarcoptic mange is a globally distributed disease caused by the burrowing mite Sarcoptes scabiei, which also causes scabies in humans. A wide and increasing number of wild mammal species are reported to be susceptible to mange; however, the impacts of the disease in wildlife populations, mechanisms involved in its eco-epidemiological dynamics, and risks to public and ecosystem health are still unclear. Major gaps exist concerning S. scabiei host specificity and the mechanisms involved in the different presentations of the disease, which change between individuals and species. Immunological responses to the mite may have a relevant role explaining these different susceptibilities, as these affect the clinical signs, and consequently, the severity of the disease. Recently, some studies have suggested sarcoptic mange as an emerging threat for wildlife, based on several outbreaks with increased severity, geographical expansions, and novel wild hosts affected. Disease ecology experts convened for the "International Meeting on Sarcoptic Mange in Wildlife" on 4-5 June 2018, hosted by the Department of Fish and Wildlife Conservation at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, Virginia, USA. The meeting had a structure of (i) pre-workshop review; (ii) presentation and discussions; and (iii) identification of priority research questions to understand sarcoptic mange in wildlife. The workgroup concluded that research priorities should be on determining the variation in modes of transmission for S. scabiei in wildlife, factors associated with the variation of disease severity among species, and long-terms effects of the mange in wildlife populations. In this note we summarize the main discussions and research gaps identified by the experts.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 18 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 35 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 35 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 8 23%
Student > Bachelor 6 17%
Researcher 6 17%
Other 3 9%
Unspecified 3 9%
Other 9 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 10 29%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 26%
Environmental Science 5 14%
Unspecified 3 9%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 6%
Other 6 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 13. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 August 2018.
All research outputs
#1,219,260
of 13,415,596 outputs
Outputs from Parasites & Vectors
#244
of 3,569 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#42,003
of 268,887 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Parasites & Vectors
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,415,596 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,569 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,887 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them