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European Pain Federation (EFIC) position paper on appropriate use of cannabis-based medicines and medical cannabis for chronic pain management

Overview of attention for article published in European Journal of Pain, September 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#12 of 1,597)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
6 news outlets
policy
1 policy source
twitter
107 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
88 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
228 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
European Pain Federation (EFIC) position paper on appropriate use of cannabis-based medicines and medical cannabis for chronic pain management
Published in
European Journal of Pain, September 2018
DOI 10.1002/ejp.1297
Pubmed ID
Authors

Winfried Häuser, David P. Finn, Eija Kalso, Nevenka Krcevski-Skvarc, Hans-Georg Kress, Bart Morlion, Serge Perrot, Michael Schäfer, Chris Wells, Silviu Brill

Abstract

Cannabis-based medicines are being approved for pain management in an increasing number of European countries. There are uncertainties and controversies on the role and appropriate use of cannabis-based medicines for the management of chronic pain. EFIC convened a European group of experts, drawn from a diverse range of basic science and relevant clinical disciplines, to prepare a position paper to empower and inform specialist and non-specialist prescribers on appropriate use of cannabis-based medicines for chronic pain. The expert panel reviewed the available literature and harnessed the clinical experience to produce these series of recommendations. Therapy with cannabis-based medicines should only be considered by experienced clinicians as part of a multidisciplinary treatment and preferably as adjunctive medication if guideline-recommended first and second line therapies have not provided sufficient efficacy or tolerability. The quantity and quality of evidence are such that cannabis-based medicines may be reasonably considered for chronic neuropathic pain. For all other chronic pain conditions (cancer,non-neuropathic non-cancer pain), the use of cannabis-based medicines should be regarded as an individual therapeutic trial. Realistic goals of therapy have to be defined. All patients must be kept under close clinical surveillance. As with any other medical therapy, if the treatment fails to reach the predefined goals and/or the patient is additionally burdened by an unacceptable level of adverse effects and/or there are signs of abuse and misuse of the drug by the patient, therapy with cannabis-based medicines should be terminated. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 107 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 228 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 228 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 34 15%
Student > Master 31 14%
Other 31 14%
Student > Bachelor 23 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 18 8%
Other 41 18%
Unknown 50 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 71 31%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 25 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 15 7%
Psychology 9 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 4%
Other 39 17%
Unknown 60 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 130. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 October 2020.
All research outputs
#202,900
of 18,999,792 outputs
Outputs from European Journal of Pain
#12
of 1,597 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#5,754
of 291,232 outputs
Outputs of similar age from European Journal of Pain
#2
of 38 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,999,792 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,597 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 291,232 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 38 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.