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Effects of Nonpharmacological Interventions for Dizziness in Older People: Systematic Review

Overview of attention for article published in Physical Therapy, May 2016
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (64th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

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6 Dimensions

Readers on

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68 Mendeley
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Title
Effects of Nonpharmacological Interventions for Dizziness in Older People: Systematic Review
Published in
Physical Therapy, May 2016
DOI 10.2522/ptj.20150349
Pubmed ID
Authors

Julie C. Kendall, Jan Hartvigsen, Michael F. Azari, Simon D. French

Abstract

Non-pharmacological interventions have been shown to have some effectiveness in adults with dizziness; however, the effectiveness of these interventions in older people is unknown. To determine the effects of conservative non-pharmacological interventions for dizziness in older people. Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, PubMed, EMBASE, SCOPUS, CINAHL, AMED, Index to Chiropractic Literature, PsychINFO and MANTIS were searched from inception to May 2014. Two investigators independently screened controlled trials with dizzy participants over 60 years of age. Dizziness from a specific diagnosis such as Meniere's disease and benign positional paroxysmal vertigo were excluded. Outcome measures from included studies included self-reported dizziness and postural balance. Two investigators independently extracted data on participants, interventions, comparison group, outcome measures and results. Methodological quality of included studies was assessed with the Cochrane Handbook 12-item risk of bias, and Cochrane Back Group 5-item clinical relevance assessment. Seven articles consisting of seven controlled trials were included. All studies utilized some form of exercise as the main intervention including vestibular rehabilitation exercises, postural balance exercises, and Tai-Chi exercise. Studies had a high risk of bias with a lack of adequate randomization and allocation concealment, reporting on co-interventions, reporting on reasons for drop-outs, and reporting on participant compliance. Heterogeneity between the included studies on interventions and outcome measures prohibited meta-analysis. Only two studies reported a significant difference between the intervention and comparison groups on self-reported dizziness. There is insufficient evidence to determine the effectiveness of non-pharmacological treatments for dizziness in older people. Current evidence suffers from high risk of bias and future well-designed trials are needed with adequate blinding, randomization and compliance.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 68 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Canada 1 1%
Unknown 67 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 17 25%
Student > Bachelor 9 13%
Other 6 9%
Researcher 5 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 7%
Other 14 21%
Unknown 12 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 21 31%
Medicine and Dentistry 16 24%
Social Sciences 6 9%
Psychology 3 4%
Sports and Recreations 3 4%
Other 7 10%
Unknown 12 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 May 2016.
All research outputs
#7,214,294
of 14,157,365 outputs
Outputs from Physical Therapy
#965
of 1,655 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#89,513
of 252,908 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Physical Therapy
#20
of 32 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,157,365 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,655 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.1. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 252,908 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 32 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.