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Consequences of exercising on ischemia–reperfusion injury in type 2 diabetic Goto-Kakizaki rat hearts: role of the HO/NOS system

Overview of attention for article published in Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome, October 2015
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Title
Consequences of exercising on ischemia–reperfusion injury in type 2 diabetic Goto-Kakizaki rat hearts: role of the HO/NOS system
Published in
Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13098-015-0080-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Krisztina Kupai, Renáta Szabó, Médea Veszelka, Amin Al Awar, Szilvia Török, Anett Csonka, Zoltán Baráth, Anikó Pósa, Csaba Varga

Abstract

It is well established that physical exercise continues to be one of the most valuable forms of non-pharmacological therapy against diabetes mellitus; however, the precise mechanism remains unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the cardioprotective effect of voluntary exercise in the Goto-Kakizaki type 2 diabetic rat heart against ischemia-reperfusion injury and to clarify its biochemical background, focusing on the nitric oxide synthase/heme oxygenase system. One group of male Goto-Kakizaki rats were allowed voluntary exercise, whereas others were kept sedentary for 6 weeks. At the end of the 6th week the hearts were isolated from both groups and subjected to 45-min coronary occlusion followed by 120-min reperfusion. The infarct size was evaluated by means of triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining. The cardiac and aortic nitric oxide synthase/heme oxygenase activities, plasma leptin and glucose concentrations were also assessed. The sedentary state prior to the ischemia-reperfusion injury was associated with a significantly higher infarct size (24.56 ± 2.21 vs. 16.66 ± 1.87 %) as compared with that in the voluntary wheel-running group. Exercise altered the constitutive nitric oxide synthase activity; an enhancement was evident in the cardiac (42.5 ± 2.72 vs. 75.6 ± 13.34 pmol/min/mg protein) and aortic tissues (382.5 ± 66.57 vs. 576.9 ± 63.16 pmol/min/mg protein). Exercise lead to a higher heme oxygenase activity (0.68 ± 0.08 vs. 0.92 ± 0.04 nmol bilirubin/h/mg protein) in the diabetic rat hearts. Exercise was associated with lower plasma leptin (192.23 ± 7.22 vs. 169.65 ± 4.6 ng/L) and blood glucose (19.61 ± 0.76 vs. 14.58 ± 0.88 mmol/L) levels. These results indicate the beneficial role of exercise against myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury in diabetic rats. These observations in experimental diabetes suggest that the cytoprotective mechanism of exercise involves modulation of the nitric oxide synthase/heme oxygenase system and metabolic parameters that may be responsible for cardioprotection.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 19 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 19 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 4 21%
Student > Postgraduate 3 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 11%
Researcher 2 11%
Student > Master 2 11%
Other 4 21%
Unknown 2 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 26%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 26%
Sports and Recreations 4 21%
Social Sciences 2 11%
Psychology 1 5%
Other 1 5%
Unknown 1 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 October 2015.
All research outputs
#5,295,377
of 6,230,503 outputs
Outputs from Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome
#206
of 244 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#152,298
of 193,771 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome
#8
of 10 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,230,503 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 244 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.2. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 193,771 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 10 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 2 of them.