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A new approach to child mental healthcare within general practice

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Family Practice, October 2015
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2 tweeters

Citations

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12 Dimensions

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30 Mendeley
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Title
A new approach to child mental healthcare within general practice
Published in
BMC Family Practice, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12875-015-0354-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Peter FM Verhaak, Marloes van Dijk, Dick Walstock, Marieke Zwaanswijk

Abstract

Child and adolescent mental health problems are frequently not identified and properly treated within general practice. Politicians in the Netherlands are promoting more primary healthcare treatment for mental health problems. The current study aims to evaluate an integrated primary mental healthcare approach for child and adolescent emotional and behavioural problems. This integrated approach allows general practitioners (GPs) to comprehensively explore the request for help, followed by an informed decision to refer, offer short-term treatment within general practice or postpone a decision by asking for additional consultations with youth mental health specialists. The study is a naturalistic evaluation of Dutch general practices with pre-test and post-test comparison with controls based on data from Electronic Medical Records (EMR). The intervention started in September 2010. EMR data of all GP contacts with children aged 4 to 18 (including diagnosis, prescriptions, referrals) from practices involved in the intervention was used from 1 January 2009 to 31 December 2012. Extra codes were added to the EMR to record aspects of the intervention. Comparable EMR data was used in control practices in 2011. GPs in the intervention group were able to identify more emotional and behavioural problems after the integrated service had started. They also identified more problems than GPs in the control practices. They were already reluctant to prescribe psychopharmacological medication to children before the intervention, and levels of prescription at intervention GP practices remained low for psychotropic drugs compared to control practices. Referral rates to mental healthcare remained relatively steady after the introduction of the integrated service, but referrals switched from specialized to primary mental healthcare. An integrated mental healthcare approach within general practice may lead to an increase in detected psychosocial problems among children, and these problems can mainly be treated within the primary care setting.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 30 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Ireland 1 3%
Unknown 29 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Postgraduate 7 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 20%
Student > Bachelor 5 17%
Student > Master 5 17%
Researcher 2 7%
Other 4 13%
Unknown 1 3%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 9 30%
Psychology 6 20%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 7%
Business, Management and Accounting 2 7%
Social Sciences 2 7%
Other 6 20%
Unknown 3 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 November 2015.
All research outputs
#5,761,614
of 10,307,691 outputs
Outputs from BMC Family Practice
#718
of 1,087 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#119,389
of 248,189 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Family Practice
#36
of 50 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 10,307,691 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,087 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 248,189 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 50 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.