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High serum cholesterol predicts rheumatoid arthritis in women, but not in men: a prospective study

Overview of attention for article published in Arthritis Research & Therapy, October 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
9 tweeters
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
4 Dimensions

Readers on

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23 Mendeley
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Title
High serum cholesterol predicts rheumatoid arthritis in women, but not in men: a prospective study
Published in
Arthritis Research & Therapy, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13075-015-0804-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Carl Turesson, Ulf Bergström, Mitra Pikwer, Jan-Åke Nilsson, Lennart TH Jacobsson

Abstract

Environmental exposures, including smoking, hormone-related factors, and metabolic factors, have been implicated in the etiology of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A previous study has indicated that blood lipid levels may influence the development of RA. The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of serum total cholesterol and triglycerides on the risk of RA in a prospective study. Among participants in a large population-based health survey (n = 33,346), individuals who subsequently developed RA were identified by linkage to four different registers and a structured review of the medical records. In a nested case-control study, with controls, matched for age, sex, and year of inclusion, from the health survey database, the relation between serum lipids (levels of total cholesterol and triglycerides) and future RA development was examined. In total, 290 individuals (151 men and 139 women) whose RA was diagnosed a median of 12 years (range of 1-28) after inclusion in the health survey were compared with 1160 controls. Women with a diagnosis of RA during the follow-up had higher total cholesterol levels at baseline compared with controls: odds ratio (OR) 1.54 per standard deviation; 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.22-1.94. This association remained statistically significant in multivariate models adjusted for smoking and a history of early menopause and in analyses stratified by rheumatoid factor status and time to RA diagnosis. Total cholesterol had no significant impact on the risk of RA in men (OR 1.03; 95 % CI 0.83-1.26). Triglycerides did not predict RA in men or women. A high total cholesterol was a risk factor for RA in women but not in men. This suggests that sex-specific exposures modify the impact of lipids on the risk of RA. Hormone-related metabolic pathways may contribute to RA development.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 23 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 4%
Unknown 22 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 3 13%
Researcher 3 13%
Student > Bachelor 2 9%
Lecturer 2 9%
Professor 2 9%
Other 7 30%
Unknown 4 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 9 39%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 9%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 9%
Arts and Humanities 1 4%
Other 2 9%
Unknown 5 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 17. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 February 2019.
All research outputs
#1,017,501
of 14,222,292 outputs
Outputs from Arthritis Research & Therapy
#214
of 2,288 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#24,170
of 253,464 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Arthritis Research & Therapy
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,222,292 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,288 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 253,464 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them