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Effectiveness of Individualized Home-Based Exercise on Turning and Balance Performance Among Adults Older than 50 yrs

Overview of attention for article published in American Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, September 2015
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (52nd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (54th percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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1 Dimensions

Readers on

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42 Mendeley
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Title
Effectiveness of Individualized Home-Based Exercise on Turning and Balance Performance Among Adults Older than 50 yrs
Published in
American Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, September 2015
DOI 10.1097/phm.0000000000000388
Pubmed ID
Authors

Asmidawati Ashari, Tengku Aizan Hamid, Mohd Rizal Hussain, Keith David Hill

Abstract

This study evaluated the effectiveness of an individualized home-based exercise program that included specific turning exercises in improving turning performance in adults identified as having unsteadiness during turning. A single-blind (assessors) randomized controlled trial was conducted with 68 community-dwelling Malaysians aged 50 yrs and older, who had abnormal turning performance (outside of age and sex, normal limits on the Step/Quick Turn Test [180-degree turn task on the NeuroCom Balance Master with long plate]). The intervention group received a 16-wk home exercise program that included two turning exercises, whereas the control group maintained their usual activities. Significant group × time effects were found using two-way repeated-measures analysis of variance for turning and balance/mobility measures. The intervention group significantly improved relative to the control group for (1) sway when turning 180 degrees Step/Quick Turn, F1,65 = 8.070, P = 0.006; (2) time to perform 180-degree turn Step/Quick Turn, F1,65 = 8.216, P = 0.006; (3) Timed Up and Go (single task), F1,65 = 6.647, P = 0.012; (4) Timed Up and Go (dual task), F1,65 = 8.301, P = 0.005; and (5) static stance sway, F1,65 = 10.491, P = 0.002. An individualized home exercise program that included specific exercises to improve turning ability was effective in improving turning performance in adults older than 50 yrs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 42 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 2%
Unknown 41 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 15 36%
Unspecified 10 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 10%
Researcher 3 7%
Professor 2 5%
Other 8 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 12 29%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 19%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 14%
Sports and Recreations 5 12%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 10%
Other 7 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 April 2016.
All research outputs
#7,116,944
of 12,372,723 outputs
Outputs from American Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation
#714
of 1,266 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#114,084
of 259,470 outputs
Outputs of similar age from American Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation
#16
of 44 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,372,723 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,266 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.1. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 259,470 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 44 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its contemporaries.