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The social dilemma of autonomous vehicles

Overview of attention for article published in Science, June 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#11 of 43,722)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Readers on

mendeley
30 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
The social dilemma of autonomous vehicles
Published in
Science, June 2016
DOI 10.1126/science.aaf2654
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jean-François Bonnefon, Azim Shariff, Iyad Rahwan, J.-F. Bonnefon, A. Shariff, I. Rahwan

Abstract

Autonomous vehicles (AVs) should reduce traffic accidents, but they will sometimes have to choose between two evils, such as running over pedestrians or sacrificing themselves and their passenger to save the pedestrians. Defining the algorithms that will help AVs make these moral decisions is a formidable challenge. We found that participants in six Amazon Mechanical Turk studies approved of utilitarian AVs (that is, AVs that sacrifice their passengers for the greater good) and would like others to buy them, but they would themselves prefer to ride in AVs that protect their passengers at all costs. The study participants disapprove of enforcing utilitarian regulations for AVs and would be less willing to buy such an AV. Accordingly, regulating for utilitarian algorithms may paradoxically increase casualties by postponing the adoption of a safer technology.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 982 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 30 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Denmark 1 3%
Unknown 29 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 7 23%
Student > Master 7 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 23%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 10%
Other 2 7%
Other 4 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Business, Management and Accounting 5 17%
Engineering 5 17%
Computer Science 4 13%
Psychology 4 13%
Unspecified 3 10%
Other 9 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2505. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 February 2018.
All research outputs
#215
of 9,108,294 outputs
Outputs from Science
#11
of 43,722 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#3
of 245,873 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Science
#1
of 704 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,108,294 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 43,722 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 35.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 245,873 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 704 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.