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Antiepileptic drugs for seizure control in people with neurocysticercosis

Overview of attention for article published in Cochrane database of systematic reviews, October 2015
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (62nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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2 news outlets
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3 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

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70 Mendeley
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Title
Antiepileptic drugs for seizure control in people with neurocysticercosis
Published in
Cochrane database of systematic reviews, October 2015
DOI 10.1002/14651858.cd009027.pub2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Monika Sharma, Tejinder Singh, Amrith Mathew

Abstract

Neurocysticercosis is the most common parasitic infection of the brain. Epilepsy is the commonest clinical presentation, though it may also present with headache, symptoms of raised intracranial tension, hydrocephalus and ocular symptoms depending upon the localisation of the parasitic cysts. Anthelmintic drugs, anti-oedema drugs, such as steroids and antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) form the mainstay of treatment. To assess the effects (benefits and harms) of AEDs for the primary and secondary prevention of seizures in people with neurocysticercosis. We searched the Cochrane Epilepsy Group Specialized Register (5 May 2015), The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library April 2015, Issue 4), MEDLINE (1946 to 5 May 2015), LILACS (Latin American and Caribbean Literature in Health Sciences, 5 May 2015), SCOPUS (1823 to 15 April 2014), ClinicalTrials.gov (7 May 2015), and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform ICTRP (7 May 2015). We also checked the references lists of identified studies, and contacted experts in the field and colleagues to search for additional studies and for information about ongoing studies. Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials.The studies may be single blind, double blind or unblinded. One review author screened all citations for eligibility.Two review authors independently extracted data and evaluated each study for risk of bias. We did not find any trials that investigated the role of AEDs in preventing seizures among people with neurocysticercosis, presenting with symptoms other than seizures.We did not find any trials that evaluated evaluating individual AEDs in people with neurocysticercosis.We found one trial, comparing two AEDs in people with solitary neurocysticercosis with seizures. However, we excluded this study from the review as it was of poor quality.We found four trials that compared the efficacy of short term versus longer term AED treatment for people with solitary neurocysticercosis (identified on CT scan) presenting with seizures. In total, 466 people were enrolled. These studies compared various AED treatment durations, six, 12 and 24 months. The risk of seizure recurrence with six months treatment compared with 12 to 24 months treatment was not statistically significant (odds ratio (OR) 1.34, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.73 to 2.47) (three studies n = 360, P 0.35). The risk of seizure recurrence with six to 12 months compared with 24 months treatment was not statistically significant (OR 1.36, 95% CI 0.72 to 2.57) (three studies, n = 385, P 0.34).Two studies co-related seizure recurrence with CT findings and suggested that persistent and calcified lesions had a higher recurrence risk and suggest longer duration of treatment with AEDs. One study reported no side effects, while the rest did not comment on side effects of drugs. None of the studies addressed the quality of life of the participants.These studies had certain methodological deficiencies such as a small sample size and a possibility of bias due to lack of blinding, which affect the results of this review. Despite neurocysticercosis being the most common cause of epilepsy worldwide, there is currently no evidence available regarding the use of AEDs as prophylaxis for preventing seizures among people presenting with symptoms other than seizures. For those presenting with seizures, there is no reliable evidence regarding the duration of treatment required. There is therefore a need for large scale randomised controlled trials to address these questions.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 70 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Ethiopia 1 1%
United Kingdom 1 1%
Unknown 68 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 15 21%
Student > Master 15 21%
Researcher 12 17%
Student > Bachelor 7 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 10%
Other 14 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 29 41%
Unspecified 15 21%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 10%
Psychology 4 6%
Social Sciences 4 6%
Other 11 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 18. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 March 2019.
All research outputs
#906,718
of 13,549,568 outputs
Outputs from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#2,816
of 10,646 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#23,050
of 251,814 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#98
of 266 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,549,568 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 10,646 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 21.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 251,814 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 266 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its contemporaries.