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Effect of diabetic retinopathy and diabetes on the intraocular straylight in pseudophakic eyes

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Ophthalmology, October 2015
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (58th percentile)

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2 tweeters

Citations

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6 Dimensions

Readers on

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15 Mendeley
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Title
Effect of diabetic retinopathy and diabetes on the intraocular straylight in pseudophakic eyes
Published in
BMC Ophthalmology, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12886-015-0120-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hyung Bin Hwang, Hye Bin Yim, Sung Kun Chung

Abstract

The aim of this study was to prove the relationship between the intraocular straylight level and diabetic retinopathy (DR) according to disease severity. Also, we aimed to evaluate whether diabetes mellitus (DM) per se could be a risk factor of increased intraocular straylight although we did not rely on a definite sign of DR in this study. In this prospective comparative study, ninety three eyes were enrolled and divided into four groups as follows: Group 1 (26 eyes), without DR or DM; Group 2 (25 eyes), with DM but without DR; Group 3 (21 eyes), mild to moderate non-proliferative DR; and Group 4 (21 eyes), severe non-proliferative DR. To measure the intraocular straylight in an objective manner, the C-quant straylight meter was used to preoperatively and 2 months postoperatively in all patients who underwent phacoemulsification surgery. All the patients also underwent a macular optical coherence tomography and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) analysis. A comparison of straylight levels adjusted by age among four groups was performed postoperatively. The postoperative level of intraocular straylight was statistically significantly different among four groups (P <0.05). When adjusted for ages, Group 4 showed the highest straylight level when compared with Group 3 and the other two groups (P <0.05). Group 1 showed the lowest straylight level in comparison with Group 2 and the other two groups (P <0.05). There was no significant correlation between HbA1c level, duration of diabetes and postoperative straylight level. The level of intraocular straylight at 2 months postoperatively had a tendency to increase as the severity of DR increased. Additionally, the straylight level was higher in DM patients without DR than in patients without DM. Therefore, the severity of DR seemed to influence the intraocular straylight level. Although there is no definite sign of DR, DM per se can be a risk factor for increasing intraocular straylight. In conclusion, the level of intraocular straylight seems to be a sensitive test for detecting early retinal damage secondary to DM.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 15 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Switzerland 1 7%
Denmark 1 7%
Unknown 13 87%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 4 27%
Student > Master 3 20%
Student > Bachelor 2 13%
Student > Postgraduate 1 7%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 1 7%
Other 4 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 47%
Unspecified 4 27%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 13%
Physics and Astronomy 1 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 7%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 October 2015.
All research outputs
#2,761,934
of 6,278,272 outputs
Outputs from BMC Ophthalmology
#158
of 468 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#93,843
of 194,900 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Ophthalmology
#11
of 29 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,278,272 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 53rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 468 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 194,900 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 29 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.