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Distinguishing between determinate and indeterminate growth in a long-lived mammal

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, October 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
15 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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22 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
61 Mendeley
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Title
Distinguishing between determinate and indeterminate growth in a long-lived mammal
Published in
BMC Evolutionary Biology, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12862-015-0487-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hannah S. Mumby, Simon N. Chapman, Jennie A. H. Crawley, Khyne U. Mar, Win Htut, Aung Thura Soe, Htoo Htoo Aung, Virpi Lummaa

Abstract

The growth strategy of a species influences many key aspects of its life-history. Animals can either grow indeterminately (throughout life), or grow determinately, ceasing at maturity. In mammals, continued weight gain after maturity is clearly distinguishable from continued skeletal growth (indeterminate growth). Elephants represent an interesting candidate for studying growth because of their large size, long life and sexual dimorphism. Objective measures of their weight, height and age, however, are rare. We investigate evidence for indeterminate growth in the Asian elephant Elephas maximus using a longitudinal dataset from a semi-captive population. We fit growth curves to weight and height measurements, assess sex differences in growth, and test for indeterminate growth by comparing the asymptotes for height and weight curves. Our results show no evidence for indeterminate growth in the Asian elephant; neither sex increases in height throughout life, with the majority of height growth completed by the age of 15 years in females and 21 years in males. Females show a similar pattern with weight, whereas males continue to gain weight until over age 50. Neither sex shows any declines in weight with age. These results have implications for understanding mammalian life-history, which could include sex-specific differences in trade-offs between size and reproductive investment.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 15 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 61 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Portugal 1 2%
France 1 2%
Unknown 59 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 28%
Researcher 8 13%
Student > Master 7 11%
Student > Bachelor 6 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 8%
Other 13 21%
Unknown 5 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 34 56%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 7%
Environmental Science 3 5%
Psychology 2 3%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 2%
Other 6 10%
Unknown 11 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 18. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 December 2015.
All research outputs
#1,143,958
of 15,872,836 outputs
Outputs from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#320
of 2,725 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#23,930
of 255,167 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,872,836 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,725 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 255,167 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them