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Cutaneous leishmaniasis in the central provinces of Hama and Edlib in Syria: Vector identification and parasite typing

Overview of attention for article published in Parasites & Vectors, October 2015
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Title
Cutaneous leishmaniasis in the central provinces of Hama and Edlib in Syria: Vector identification and parasite typing
Published in
Parasites & Vectors, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13071-015-1147-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nabil Haddad, Hanadi Saliba, Atef Altawil, Jeffrey Villinsky, Samar Al-Nahhas

Abstract

Cutaneous leishmaniasis is a disease transmitted by sand fly bites. This disease is highly prevalent in Syria where Leishmania major and Leishmania tropica are the known aetiological agents. In 2011, more than 58,000 cases were reported in the country by the Ministry of Health. The central region of the country harbors 20 % of the reported cases. However, the epidemiology of the disease in this area is not well understood. An epidemiological survey was conducted in 2010 to identity the circulating parasite and the sand fly vector in the central provinces of Edlib and Hama. Sand fly specimens were collected using CDC light traps and identified morphologically. Total DNA was extracted from the abdomens of female specimens and from Giemsa-stained skin lesion smears of 80 patients. Leishmania parasites were first identified by sequencing the ITS1 gene amplicons. Then polymorphism analysis was performed using the RFLP technique. A total of 2142 sand flies were collected. They belonged to eight species, among which Phlebotomus sergenti and Phlebotomus papatasi were the most predominant. L. tropica ITS1 gene was amplified from two pools of P. sergenti specimens and from skin smears of cutaneous leishmaniasis patients. This suggests that P. sergenti is the potential vector species in the study area. The digestion profiles of the obtained amplicons by TaqI restriction enzyme were identical for all analysed L. tropica parasites. Moreover, L. infantum ITS1 gene was amplified from two pools of Phlebotomus tobbi in the relatively humid zone of Edlib. L. tropica is confirmed to be the aetiological agent of cutaneous leishmaniasis cases in the central provinces. RFLP technique failed to show any genetic heterogeneity in the ITS1 gene among the tested parasites. The molecular detection of this parasite in human skin smears and in P. sergenti supports the vector status of this species in the study area. The detection of L. infantum in P. tobbi specimens indicates a potential circulation of this parasite in the humid zone of Edlib. Further epidemiological studies are needed to evaluate the burden of this visceral parasite in the study region.

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 31 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 31 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 8 26%
Student > Master 6 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 19%
Student > Bachelor 5 16%
Librarian 2 6%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 3 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 23%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 16%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 4 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 13%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 3%
Other 5 16%
Unknown 5 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 October 2015.
All research outputs
#10,002,645
of 15,703,527 outputs
Outputs from Parasites & Vectors
#2,475
of 4,215 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#138,033
of 254,848 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Parasites & Vectors
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,703,527 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,215 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.7. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 254,848 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them