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Atlantic hurricanes and climate over the past 1,500 years

Overview of attention for article published in Nature, August 2009
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
4 blogs
policy
1 policy source
twitter
183 X users
wikipedia
9 Wikipedia pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
203 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
361 Mendeley
citeulike
4 CiteULike
connotea
1 Connotea
Title
Atlantic hurricanes and climate over the past 1,500 years
Published in
Nature, August 2009
DOI 10.1038/nature08219
Pubmed ID
Authors

Michael E. Mann, Jonathan D. Woodruff, Jeffrey P. Donnelly, Zhihua Zhang

Abstract

Atlantic tropical cyclone activity, as measured by annual storm counts, reached anomalous levels over the past decade. The short nature of the historical record and potential issues with its reliability in earlier decades, however, has prompted an ongoing debate regarding the reality and significance of the recent rise. Here we place recent activity in a longer-term context by comparing two independent estimates of tropical cyclone activity over the past 1,500 years. The first estimate is based on a composite of regional sedimentary evidence of landfalling hurricanes, while the second estimate uses a previously published statistical model of Atlantic tropical cyclone activity driven by proxy reconstructions of past climate changes. Both approaches yield consistent evidence of a peak in Atlantic tropical cyclone activity during medieval times (around ad 1000) followed by a subsequent lull in activity. The statistical model indicates that the medieval peak, which rivals or even exceeds (within uncertainties) recent levels of activity, results from the reinforcing effects of La-Niña-like climate conditions and relative tropical Atlantic warmth.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 183 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 361 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 14 4%
Jamaica 3 <1%
Germany 2 <1%
Japan 2 <1%
Mexico 2 <1%
Chile 1 <1%
Cuba 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
Other 12 3%
Unknown 322 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 99 27%
Student > Ph. D. Student 62 17%
Student > Master 40 11%
Student > Bachelor 36 10%
Professor > Associate Professor 27 7%
Other 57 16%
Unknown 40 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Earth and Planetary Sciences 160 44%
Environmental Science 57 16%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 33 9%
Social Sciences 16 4%
Engineering 11 3%
Other 28 8%
Unknown 56 16%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 167. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 January 2024.
All research outputs
#247,684
of 25,709,917 outputs
Outputs from Nature
#14,089
of 98,566 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#567
of 123,357 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature
#12
of 491 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,709,917 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 98,566 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 102.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 123,357 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 491 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.