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A five-year prospective study of spinal radiographic progression and its predictors in men and women with ankylosing spondylitis

Overview of attention for article published in Arthritis Research & Therapy, August 2018
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (81st percentile)

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15 tweeters

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8 Dimensions

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Title
A five-year prospective study of spinal radiographic progression and its predictors in men and women with ankylosing spondylitis
Published in
Arthritis Research & Therapy, August 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13075-018-1665-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anna Deminger, Eva Klingberg, Mats Geijer, Jan Göthlin, Martin Hedberg, Eva Rehnberg, Hans Carlsten, Lennart T. Jacobsson, Helena Forsblad-d’Elia

Abstract

Knowledge about predictors of new spinal bone formation in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is limited. AS-related spinal alterations are more common in men; however, knowledge of whether predictors differ between sexes is lacking. Our objectives were to study spinal radiographic progression in patients with AS and investigate predictors of progression overall and by sex. Swedish patients with AS, age (mean ± SD) 50 ± 13 years, were included in a longitudinal study. At baseline and at 5-year follow up, spinal radiographs were graded according to the modified Stoke Ankylosing Spondylitis Spine Score (mSASSS). Predictors were assessed by questionnaires, spinal mobility tests and blood samples. Of 204 patients included, 166 (81%) were re-examined and 54% were men. Men had significantly higher mean mSASSS at baseline and higher mean increase in mSASSS than women (1.9 ± 2.8 vs. 1.2 ± 3.3; p = 0.005) More men than women developed new syndesmophytes (30% vs. 12%; p = 0.007). Multivariate logistic regression analyses with progression ≥ 2 mSASSS units over 5 years or development of new syndesmophytes as the dependent variable showed that presence of baseline AS-related spinal radiographic alterations and obesity (OR 3.78, 95% CI 1.3 to 11.2) were independent predictors of spinal radiographic progression in both sexes. High C-reactive protein (CRP) was a significant predictor in men, with only a trend seen in women. Smoking predicted progression in men whereas high Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index (BASMI) and exposure to bisphosphonates during follow up (OR 4.78, 95% CI 1.1 to 20.1) predicted progression in women. This first report on sex-specific predictors of spinal radiographic progression shows that predictors may partly differ between the sexes. New predictors identified were obesity in both sexes and exposure to bisphosphonates in women. Among previously known predictors, baseline AS-related spinal radiographic alterations predicted radiographic progression in both sexes, high CRP was a predictor in men (with a trend in women) and smoking was a predictor only in men. ClinicalTrials.gov , NCT00858819 . Registered on 9 March 2009. Last updated 28 May 2015.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 15 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 8 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 8 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Professor 2 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 25%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 25%
Student > Bachelor 1 13%
Student > Master 1 13%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 4 50%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 38%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 August 2018.
All research outputs
#1,470,091
of 13,538,219 outputs
Outputs from Arthritis Research & Therapy
#375
of 2,196 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#48,383
of 266,758 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Arthritis Research & Therapy
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,538,219 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,196 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,758 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them