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Clock gene expression and locomotor activity predict death in the last days of life in Drosophila melanogaster

Overview of attention for article published in Scientific Reports, August 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
4 news outlets
twitter
28 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

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3 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
17 Mendeley
Title
Clock gene expression and locomotor activity predict death in the last days of life in Drosophila melanogaster
Published in
Scientific Reports, August 2018
DOI 10.1038/s41598-018-30323-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jia Zhao, Guy Robert Warman, James Frederick Cheeseman

Abstract

The importance of the circadian clock for the regulation of behaviour and physiology, and the molecular control of these rhythms by a set of clock genes are well defined. The circadian clock deteriorates with advancing age but the mechanism underlying is unclear. Here we recorded the expression of two key clock genes in young, middle-aged and old Drosophila using transgenic luciferase lines reporting period and timeless in vivo. We report a novel marker of imminent death in the expression of TIMELESS. In the days immediately preceding death TIMELESS expression increased to at least 150% of previous acrophase values (88.0% of n = 217) and lost circadian rhythmicity, which predicted death equally well in flies of different ages and under light and temperature cycles. We suggest this transient aberrant clock-gene expression is central to the mechanism of the disturbance in circadian behaviour before death (82.7% of n = 342). We also find that PERIOD expression in central-clock neurons remained robust with age, however PERIOD and TIMELESS in peripheral clocks showed a reduction in both expression level and rhythmicity. In conclusion, as flies age the molecular clock gradually declines at the peripheral level but continues to function at the central until days before death.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 28 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 17 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 17 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Postgraduate 4 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 24%
Student > Bachelor 3 18%
Researcher 2 12%
Professor 1 6%
Other 2 12%
Unknown 1 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 53%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 18%
Neuroscience 2 12%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 6%
Chemistry 1 6%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 1 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 46. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 August 2019.
All research outputs
#393,785
of 13,935,576 outputs
Outputs from Scientific Reports
#4,594
of 70,263 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#15,019
of 274,250 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scientific Reports
#3
of 54 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,935,576 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 70,263 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 274,250 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 54 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.