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An exploration of the link between adult attachment and problematic Facebook use

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Psychology, August 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#11 of 301)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
10 news outlets
blogs
3 blogs
twitter
41 tweeters
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
1 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
44 Mendeley
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Title
An exploration of the link between adult attachment and problematic Facebook use
Published in
BMC Psychology, August 2018
DOI 10.1186/s40359-018-0245-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sally Flynn, Chris Noone, Kiran M. Sarma

Abstract

Previous studies have reported on positive and negative psychological outcomes associated with the use of social networking sites (SNSs). Research efforts linking Facebook use with depression and low self-esteem have indicated that it might be the manner in which people engage with the site that makes its use problematic for some people. The aim of the current study was to test a theoretical model of problematic Facebook use, using adult attachment style as the predictor variable of interest. A cross-sectional design was employed wherein adult Facebook users (n = 717) completed measures of psychological distress, self-esteem, and adult attachment, in addition to measures of problematic Facebook use (i.e. social comparison, self-disclosures, impression management, & intrusive Facebook use). Data were analysed using hierarchical multiple regression and mediation analyses. The results of this study indicated that attachment anxiety was predictive of all facets of problematic Facebook use, and that attachment avoidance was predictive of impression management, and social consequences of intrusive Facebook use. Further analyses confirmed the mediating influences of psychological distress and self-esteem on these relationships. Users of Facebook with higher levels of attachment insecurity may be gravitating towards the site in order to fulfil their attachment needs. This tendency is likely to be particularly prevalent for those individuals with low self-esteem who are experiencing psychological distress.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 41 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 44 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 44 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 11 25%
Unspecified 8 18%
Student > Bachelor 7 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 11%
Other 4 9%
Other 9 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 22 50%
Unspecified 9 20%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 5%
Neuroscience 2 5%
Other 6 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 128. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 February 2019.
All research outputs
#117,119
of 13,504,032 outputs
Outputs from BMC Psychology
#11
of 301 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#5,100
of 267,920 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Psychology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,504,032 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 301 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 22.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,920 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them