↓ Skip to main content

The glycaemic outcomes of Cinnamon, a review of the experimental evidence and clinical trials

Overview of attention for article published in Nutrition Journal, October 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
6 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
77 tweeters
facebook
8 Facebook pages
googleplus
2 Google+ users
video
5 video uploaders

Citations

dimensions_citation
54 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
251 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
The glycaemic outcomes of Cinnamon, a review of the experimental evidence and clinical trials
Published in
Nutrition Journal, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12937-015-0098-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Arjuna B. Medagama

Abstract

Cinnamon is currently marketed as a remedy for obesity, glucose intolerance, diabetes mellitus and dyslipidaemia. Integrative medicine is a new concept that combines conventional treatment with evidence-based complementary therapies. The aim of this review is to critically evaluate the experimental evidence available for cinnamon in improving glycaemic targets in animal models and humans. Insulin receptor auto-phosphorlylation and de-phosphorylation, glucose transporter 4 (GLUT-4 ) receptor synthesis and translocation, modulation of hepatic glucose metabolism through changes in Pyruvate kinase (PK) and Phosphenol Pyruvate Carboxikinase (PEPCK), altering the expression of PPAR (γ) and inhibition of intestinal glucosidases are some of the mechanisms responsible for improving glycaemic control with cinnamon therapy. We reviewed 8 clinical trials that used Cinnamomum cassia in aqueous or powder form in doses ranging from 500 mg to 6 g per day for a duration lasting from 40 days to 4 months as well as 2 clinical trials that used cinnamon on treatment naïve patients with pre-diabetes. An improvement in glycaemic control was seen in patients who received Cinnamon as the sole therapy for diabetes, those with pre-diabetes (IFG or IGT) and in those with high pre-treatment HbA1c. In animal models, cinnamon reduced fasting and postprandial plasma glucose and HbA1c. Cinnamon has the potential to be a useful add-on therapy in the discipline of integrative medicine in managing type 2 diabetes. At present the evidence is inconclusive and long-term trials aiming to establish the efficacy and safety of cinnamon is needed. However, high coumarin content of Cinnamomum cassia is a concern, but Cinnamomum zeylanicum with its low coumarin content would be a safer alternate.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 77 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 251 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Australia 1 <1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
Unknown 249 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 67 27%
Student > Master 39 16%
Researcher 26 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 25 10%
Student > Postgraduate 23 9%
Other 37 15%
Unknown 34 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 48 19%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 40 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 34 14%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 32 13%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 16 6%
Other 36 14%
Unknown 45 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 122. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 September 2020.
All research outputs
#169,874
of 15,873,363 outputs
Outputs from Nutrition Journal
#59
of 1,209 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#4,156
of 287,687 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nutrition Journal
#12
of 196 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,873,363 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,209 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 28.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 287,687 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 196 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.