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Sex-specific impact of prenatal androgens on social brain default mode subsystems

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular Psychiatry, August 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (71st percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

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10 tweeters

Citations

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Readers on

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35 Mendeley
Title
Sex-specific impact of prenatal androgens on social brain default mode subsystems
Published in
Molecular Psychiatry, August 2018
DOI 10.1038/s41380-018-0198-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Michael V. Lombardo, Bonnie Auyeung, Tiziano Pramparo, Angélique Quartier, Jérémie Courraud, Rosemary J. Holt, Jack Waldman, Amber N. V. Ruigrok, Natasha Mooney, Richard A. I. Bethlehem, Meng-Chuan Lai, Prantik Kundu, Edward T. Bullmore, Jean-Louis Mandel, Amélie Piton, Simon Baron-Cohen

Abstract

Early-onset neurodevelopmental conditions (e.g., autism) affect males more frequently than females. Androgens may play a role in this male-bias by sex-differentially impacting early prenatal brain development, particularly neural circuits that later develop specialized roles in social cognition. Here, we find that increasing prenatal testosterone in humans is associated with later reduction of functional connectivity between social brain default mode (DMN) subsystems in adolescent males, but has no effect in females. Since testosterone can work directly via the androgen receptor (AR) or indirectly via the estrogen receptor through aromatase conversion to estradiol, we further examined how a potent non-aromatizable androgen, dihydrotestosterone (DHT), acts via the AR to influence gene expression in human neural stem cells (hNSC)-particularly for genes of high-relevance for DMN circuitry. DHT dysregulates a number of genes enriched for syndromic causes of autism and intellectual disability and for genes that in later development are expressed in anatomical patterns that highly correspond to the cortical midline DMN subsystem. DMN-related and DHT-affected genes (e.g., MEF2C) are involved in a number of synaptic processes, many of which impact excitation-inhibition balance. Androgens have male-specific prenatal influence over social brain circuitry in humans and may be relevant towards explaining some component of male-bias in early-onset neurodevelopmental conditions.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 35 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 35 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 23%
Unspecified 6 17%
Researcher 5 14%
Student > Bachelor 5 14%
Student > Master 3 9%
Other 8 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 11 31%
Neuroscience 9 26%
Psychology 7 20%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 11%
Computer Science 2 6%
Other 2 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 April 2019.
All research outputs
#3,017,770
of 13,635,031 outputs
Outputs from Molecular Psychiatry
#1,441
of 2,715 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#75,346
of 266,585 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular Psychiatry
#55
of 88 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,635,031 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 77th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,715 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 28.6. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,585 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 88 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.