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The influence of orthopedic corsets on the incidence of pathological fractures in patients with spinal bone metastases after radiotherapy

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Cancer, October 2015
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Title
The influence of orthopedic corsets on the incidence of pathological fractures in patients with spinal bone metastases after radiotherapy
Published in
BMC Cancer, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12885-015-1797-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Harald Rief, Robert Förster, Stefan Rieken, Thomas Bruckner, Ingmar Schlampp, Tilman Bostel, Jürgen Debus

Abstract

Clinical care of unstable spinal bone metastases in many centers often includes patient immobilization by means of an orthopedic corset in order to prevent pathological fractures. The aim of this retrospective analysis was to evaluate the incidence of pathological fractures after radiotherapy (RT) in patients with and without orthopedic corsets and to assess prognostic factors for pathological fractures in patients with spinal bone metastases. The incidence of pathological fractures in 915 patients with 2.195 osteolytic metastases in the thoracic and lumbar spine was evaluated retrospectively on the basis of computed tomography (CT) scans between January 2000 and January 2012 depending on prescription and wearing of patient-customized orthopedic corsets. In the corset group, 6.8 and 8.0 % in no-corset group showed pathological fractures prior to RT, no significant difference between groups was detected (p = 0.473). After 6 months, patients in the corset group showed pathological fractures in 8.6 % and in no-corset group in 9.3 % (p = 0.709). The univariate and bivariate analyses demonstrated no significant prognostic factor for incidence of pathological fractures in both groups. In this analysis, we could show for the first time in more than 900 patients, that abandoning a general corset supply in patients with spinal metastases does not significantly cause increased rates of pathological fractures. Importantly, the incidence of pathological fracture after RT was small.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 12 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 8%
Unknown 11 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 3 25%
Other 2 17%
Student > Bachelor 2 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 8%
Student > Master 1 8%
Other 2 17%
Unknown 1 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 42%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 25%
Neuroscience 1 8%
Philosophy 1 8%
Unknown 2 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 April 2019.
All research outputs
#11,167,772
of 14,684,909 outputs
Outputs from BMC Cancer
#3,208
of 5,574 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#179,895
of 282,353 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Cancer
#419
of 759 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,684,909 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,574 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.0. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 759 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.