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Dental calculus evidence of Taï Forest Chimpanzee plant consumption and life history transitions

Overview of attention for article published in Scientific Reports, October 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (89th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
3 news outlets
twitter
1 tweeter
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages

Citations

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45 Dimensions

Readers on

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42 Mendeley
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Title
Dental calculus evidence of Taï Forest Chimpanzee plant consumption and life history transitions
Published in
Scientific Reports, October 2015
DOI 10.1038/srep15161
Pubmed ID
Authors

Robert C. Power, Domingo C. Salazar-García, Roman M. Wittig, Martin Freiberg, Amanda G. Henry

Abstract

Dental calculus (calcified dental plaque) is a source of multiple types of data on life history. Recent research has targeted the plant microremains preserved in this mineralised deposit as a source of dietary and health information for recent and past populations. However, it is unclear to what extent we can interpret behaviour from microremains. Few studies to date have directly compared the microremain record from dental calculus to dietary records, and none with long-term observation dietary records, thus limiting how we can interpret diet, food acquisition and behaviour. Here we present a high-resolution analysis of calculus microremains from wild chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes verus) of Taï National Park, Côte d'Ivoire. We test microremain assemblages against more than two decades of field behavioural observations to establish the ability of calculus to capture the composition of diet. Our results show that some microremain classes accumulate as long-lived dietary markers. Phytolith abundance in calculus can reflect the proportions of plants in the diet, yet this pattern is not true for starches. We also report microremains can record information about other dietary behaviours, such as the age of weaning and learned food processing techniques like nut-cracking.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 42 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 2%
Unknown 41 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 33%
Student > Master 7 17%
Researcher 6 14%
Professor 4 10%
Student > Bachelor 2 5%
Other 5 12%
Unknown 4 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 18 43%
Social Sciences 5 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 10%
Arts and Humanities 3 7%
Unspecified 2 5%
Other 4 10%
Unknown 6 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 27. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 December 2021.
All research outputs
#1,111,978
of 21,338,015 outputs
Outputs from Scientific Reports
#11,065
of 113,280 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#20,862
of 301,949 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scientific Reports
#415
of 4,145 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,338,015 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 113,280 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 17.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 301,949 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4,145 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.