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Opposing roles of CB1and CB2cannabinoid receptors in the stimulant and rewarding effects of cocaine

Overview of attention for article published in British Journal of Pharmacology, September 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (54th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (54th percentile)

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4 tweeters

Citations

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17 Dimensions

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45 Mendeley
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Title
Opposing roles of CB1and CB2cannabinoid receptors in the stimulant and rewarding effects of cocaine
Published in
British Journal of Pharmacology, September 2018
DOI 10.1111/bph.14473
Pubmed ID
Authors

Pedro H Gobira, Ana C Oliveira, Julia S Gomes, Vivian T da Silveira, Laila Asth, Juliana R Bastos, Edleusa M Batista, Ana C Issy, Bright N Okine, Antonio C de Oliveira, Fabiola M Ribeiro, Elaine A Del Bel, Daniele C Aguiar, David P Finn, Fabricio A Moreira

Abstract

The endocannabinoids anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) bind to CB1 and CB2 receptors in the brain and modulate the mesolimbic dopaminergic pathway. This neurocircuitry is engaged by psychostimulant drugs, including cocaine. Although it is known that CB1 antagonism as well as CB2 activation inhibit certain effects of cocaine, they have been investigated separately. Here we tested the hypothesis that there is a reciprocal interaction between CB1 blockade and CB2 activation in modulating behavioural responses to cocaine. Male Swiss mice received intraperitoneal injections of cannabinoid-related drugs followed by cocaine. The animals were tested for cocaine-induced hyperlocomotion, c-Fos expression in the nucleus accumbens and conditioned place preference. The levels of endocannabinoids after cocaine injections were also analysed. The CB1 antagonist, rimonabant, and the CB2 agonist, JWH133, prevented cocaine-induced hyperlocomotion. The same result as obtained by combining sub-effective doses of both compounds. The CB2 receptor antagonist, AM630, reversed the inhibitory effects of rimonabant in cocaine-induced hyperlocomotion and c-Fos expression in the nucleus accumbens. Selective inhibitors of anandamide and 2-AG hydrolyses (URB597 and JZL184, respectively) failed to modify this response. However, JZL184 did prevent cocaine-induced hyperlocomotion if administered after a sub-effective dose of rimonabant. Cocaine did not change brain endocannabinoid levels. Finally, CB2 blockade reversed the inhibitory effect of rimonabant in the acquisition of cocaine-induced conditioned place preference. The present data support the hypothesis that CB1 and CB2 receptors work in concert with opposing functions to modulate certain addiction-related effects of cocaine.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 45 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 45 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 9 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 20%
Student > Bachelor 6 13%
Professor 4 9%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 7%
Other 8 18%
Unknown 6 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 8 18%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 7 16%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 11%
Chemistry 4 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 9%
Other 7 16%
Unknown 10 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 August 2018.
All research outputs
#7,390,457
of 13,807,706 outputs
Outputs from British Journal of Pharmacology
#4,351
of 5,760 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#122,745
of 270,720 outputs
Outputs of similar age from British Journal of Pharmacology
#31
of 71 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,807,706 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,760 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.9. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 270,720 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 71 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its contemporaries.