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Persistent inequalities in unplanned hospitalisation among colon cancer patients across critical phases of their care pathway, England, 2011–13

Overview of attention for article published in British Journal of Cancer, August 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
5 news outlets
twitter
13 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
2 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
8 Mendeley
Title
Persistent inequalities in unplanned hospitalisation among colon cancer patients across critical phases of their care pathway, England, 2011–13
Published in
British Journal of Cancer, August 2018
DOI 10.1038/s41416-018-0170-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Camille Maringe, Bernard Rachet, Georgios Lyratzopoulos, Francisco Javier Rubio

Abstract

Reducing hospital emergency admissions is a key target for all modern health systems. We analysed colon cancer patients diagnosed in 2011-13 in England. We screened their individual Hospital Episode Statistics records in the 90 days pre-diagnosis, the 90 days post-diagnosis, and the 90 days pre-death (in the year following diagnosis), for the occurrence of hospital emergency admissions (HEAs). Between a quarter and two thirds of patients experience HEA in the three 90-day periods examined: pre-diagnosis, post-diagnosis and before death. Patients with tumour stage I-III from more deprived backgrounds had higher proportions of HEAs than less deprived patients during all studied periods. This remains even after adjusting for differing distributions of risk factors such as age, sex, comorbidity and stage at diagnosis. Although in some cases HEAs might be unavoidable or even appropriate, the proportion of HEAs varies by socioeconomic status, even after controlling for the usual patient factors, suggestive of remediable causes of excess emergency healthcare utilisation in patients belonging to higher deprivation groups. Future inquiries should address the potential role of clinical complications, sub-optimal healthcare administration, premature discharge or a lack of social support as potential explanations for these patterns of inequality.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 13 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 8 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 8 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 2 25%
Other 2 25%
Student > Master 2 25%
Researcher 1 13%
Lecturer 1 13%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 2 25%
Unspecified 2 25%
Social Sciences 2 25%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 13%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 13%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 48. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 September 2019.
All research outputs
#364,304
of 13,605,565 outputs
Outputs from British Journal of Cancer
#152
of 8,165 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#14,238
of 266,010 outputs
Outputs of similar age from British Journal of Cancer
#5
of 94 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,605,565 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,165 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,010 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 94 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.