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Stage-specific incidence trends of melanoma in an English region, 1996–2015

Overview of attention for article published in Melanoma Research, June 2020
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Title
Stage-specific incidence trends of melanoma in an English region, 1996–2015
Published in
Melanoma Research, June 2020
DOI 10.1097/cmr.0000000000000489
Pubmed ID
Authors

Annie Herbert, Minjoung M. Koo, Matthew E. Barclay, David C. Greenberg, Gary A. Abel, Nick J. Levell, Georgios Lyratzopoulos

Abstract

The aim of this study was to examine temporal trends in overall and stage-specific incidence of melanoma. Using population-based data on patients diagnosed with melanoma in East Anglia, England, 1996-2015, we estimated age-standardized time trends in annual incidence rates for each stage at diagnosis. Negative binomial regression was used to model trends over time adjusted for sex, age group and deprivation, and to subsequently examine variation in stage-specific trends by sex and age group. The age-standardized incidence increased from 14 to 29 cases/100 000 persons (i.e. 4% annually). Increasing incidence was apparent across all stages but was steepest for stage I [adjusted annual increase: 5%, 95% confidence interval (CI): 5-6%, and more gradual for stage II-IV disease (stage II: 3%, 95% CI: 2-4%; stage III/IV: 2%, 95% CI: 1-3%)]. Stage II-IV increase was apparent in men across age groups and in women aged 50 years or older. Increases in incidence were steeper in those aged 70 years or older, and in men. The findings suggest that both a genuine increase in the incidence of consequential illness and a degree of overdiagnosis may be responsible for the observed increasing incidence trends in melanoma in our population during the study period. They also suggest the potentially lower effectiveness of public health awareness campaigns in men and older people.This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0 (CCBY), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 3 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 3 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 1 33%
Student > Master 1 33%
Unknown 1 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 1 33%
Social Sciences 1 33%
Unknown 1 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 May 2020.
All research outputs
#12,361,496
of 15,555,958 outputs
Outputs from Melanoma Research
#596
of 808 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#206,213
of 276,514 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Melanoma Research
#7
of 9 outputs
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