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Psychological and behavioral differences between low back pain populations: a comparative analysis of chiropractic, primary and secondary care patients

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, October 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (72nd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (69th percentile)

Mentioned by

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6 tweeters
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

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23 Mendeley
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Title
Psychological and behavioral differences between low back pain populations: a comparative analysis of chiropractic, primary and secondary care patients
Published in
BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12891-015-0753-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Andreas Eklund, Gunnar Bergström, Lennart Bodin, Iben Axén

Abstract

Psychological, behavioral and social factors have long been considered important in the development of persistent pain. Little is known about how chiropractic low back pain (LBP) patients compare to other LBP patients in terms of psychological/behavioral characteristics. In this cross-sectional study, the aim was to investigate patients with LBP as regards to psychosocial/behavioral characteristics by describing a chiropractic primary care population and comparing this sample to three other populations using the MPI-S instrument. Thus, four different samples were compared. A: Four hundred eighty subjects from chiropractic primary care clinics. B: One hundred twenty-eight subjects from a gainfully employed population (sick listed with high risk of developing chronicity). C: Two hundred seventy-three subjects from a secondary care rehabilitation clinic. D: Two hundred thirty-five subjects from secondary care clinics. The Swedish version of the Multidimensional Pain Inventory (MPI-S) was used to collect data. Subjects were classified using a cluster analytic strategy into three pre-defined subgroups (named adaptive copers, dysfunctional and interpersonally distressed). The data show statistically significant overall differences across samples for the subgroups based on psychological and behavioral characteristics. The cluster classifications placed (in terms of the proportions of the adaptive copers and dysfunctional subgroups) sample A between B and the two secondary care samples C and D. The chiropractic primary care sample was more affected by pain and worse off with regards to psychological and behavioral characteristics compared to the other primary care sample. Based on our findings from the MPI-S instrument the 4 samples may be considered statistically and clinically different. Sample A comes from an ongoing trial registered at clinical trials.gov; NCT01539863 , February 22, 2012.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 23 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 9%
Sweden 1 4%
Unknown 20 87%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 5 22%
Student > Bachelor 5 22%
Researcher 4 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 13%
Student > Master 3 13%
Other 3 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 61%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 13%
Psychology 2 9%
Sports and Recreations 1 4%
Neuroscience 1 4%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 2 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 December 2017.
All research outputs
#3,634,753
of 13,384,198 outputs
Outputs from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#816
of 2,647 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#77,253
of 281,558 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#74
of 241 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,384,198 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 72nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,647 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 281,558 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 241 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.