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Spring temperature, migration chronology, and nutrient allocation to eggs in three species of arctic-nesting geese: Implications for resilience to climate warming

Overview of attention for article published in Global Change Biology, September 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (89th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
16 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
5 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
29 Mendeley
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Title
Spring temperature, migration chronology, and nutrient allocation to eggs in three species of arctic-nesting geese: Implications for resilience to climate warming
Published in
Global Change Biology, September 2018
DOI 10.1111/gcb.14418
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jerry W. Hupp, David H. Ward, David X. Soto, Keith A. Hobson

Abstract

The macronutrients that Arctic herbivores invest in their offspring are derived from endogenous reserves of fat and protein (capital) that females build prior to the period of investment or from foods they consume concurrently with investment (income). The relative contribution from each source can be influenced by temporal and environmental constraints on a female's ability to forage on Arctic breeding areas. Warming temperatures and advancing Arctic phenology may alter those constraints. From 2011 to 2014, we examined relationships among spring temperature, timing of migration and reproduction, and the sources of nutrients females deposited in eggs for three sympatric species of geese that nested in northern Alaska. Compared to lesser snow geese (Anser caerulescens caerulescens) and greater white-fronted geese (Anser albifrons frontalis), black brant (Branta bernicla nigricans) were more likely to initiate follicle development during migration, resulting in fewer days between their arrival in the Arctic and the onset of incubation and requiring a relatively greater capital investment in eggs. Delaying follicle development until after their arrival in the Arctic provided snow geese and white-fronted geese an opportunity to forage near their nesting area and to deposit exogenous nutrients in eggs. With warmer spring temperatures, brant invested more capital in eggs, but snow geese invested less capital. Brant likely used capital to meet costs associated with earlier onset of follicle development when phenology was advanced, whereas snow geese used capital to compensate for poor foraging conditions during colder Arctic springs. Global warming is likely to reduce the quality of lower latitude marine habitats where brant acquire endogenous reserves and advancing Arctic phenology may increase their reliance on those reserves during reproduction. Near-term warming in northern Alaska may improve foraging conditions and favor the reproductive strategies of some herbivores such as snow geese and white-fronted geese that mainly invest Arctic nutrients in their offspring.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 16 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 29 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 29 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 8 28%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 14%
Student > Master 2 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 3%
Student > Bachelor 1 3%
Other 3 10%
Unknown 10 34%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 34%
Environmental Science 4 14%
Unspecified 1 3%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 1 3%
Social Sciences 1 3%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 12 41%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 20. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 October 2018.
All research outputs
#817,799
of 13,622,595 outputs
Outputs from Global Change Biology
#986
of 3,714 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#29,032
of 266,025 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Global Change Biology
#63
of 127 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,622,595 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,714 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 21.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,025 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 127 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.