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E-Health interventions for anxiety and depression in children and adolescents with long-term physical conditions

Overview of attention for article published in Cochrane database of systematic reviews, August 2018
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

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146 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages
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1 video uploader

Citations

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2 Dimensions

Readers on

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441 Mendeley
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Title
E-Health interventions for anxiety and depression in children and adolescents with long-term physical conditions
Published in
Cochrane database of systematic reviews, August 2018
DOI 10.1002/14651858.cd012489.pub2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hiran Thabrew, Karolina Stasiak, Sarah E Hetrick, Stephen Wong, Jessica H Huss, Sally N Merry

Abstract

Long-term physical conditions affect 10% to 12% of children and adolescents worldwide; these individuals are at greater risk of developing psychological problems, particularly anxiety and depression. Access to face-to-face treatment for such problems is often limited, and available interventions usually have not been tested with this population. As technology improves, e-health interventions (delivered via digital means, such as computers and smart phones and ranging from simple text-based programmes through to multimedia and interactive programmes, serious games, virtual reality and biofeedback programmes) offer a potential solution to address the psychological needs of this group of young people. To assess the effectiveness of e-health interventions in comparison with attention placebos, psychological placebos, treatment as usual, waiting-list controls, or non-psychological treatments for treating anxiety and depression in children and adolescents with long-term physical conditions. We searched the Cochrane Common Mental Disorders Group's Controlled Trials Register (CCMDTR to May 2016), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (Issue 8, 2017), Web of Science (1900 - 18 August 2016, updated 31 August 2017) and Ovid MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO (cross-search 2016 to 18 Aug 2017). We hand-searched relevant conference proceedings, reference lists of included articles, and the grey literature to May 2016. We also searched international trial registries to identify unpublished or ongoing trials. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs), cluster-randomised trials, and cross-over trials of e-health interventions for treating any type of long-term physical condition in children and adolescents (aged 0 to 18 years), and that measured changes in symptoms or diagnoses of anxiety, depression, or subthreshold depression. We defined long-term physical conditions as those that were more than three-months' duration. We assessed symptoms of anxiety and depression using patient- or clinician-administered validated rating scales based on DSM III, IV or 5 (American Psychological Association 2013), or ICD 9 or 10 criteria (World Health Organization 1992). Formal depressive and anxiety disorders were diagnosed using structured clinical interviews. Attention placebo, treatment as usual, waiting list, psychological placebo, and other non-psychological therapies were eligible comparators. Two review authors independently reviewed titles, abstracts, and full-text articles; discrepancies were resolved through discussion or addressed by a third author. When available, we used odds ratio (OR) to compare dichotomous data and standardised mean differences (SMD) to analyse continuous data, both with 95% confidence intervals (CI). We undertook meta-analysis when treatments, participants, and the underlying clinical question were adequately similar. Otherwise, we undertook a narrative analysis. We included five trials of three interventions (Breathe Easier Online, Web-MAP, and multimodal cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT)), which included 463 participants aged 10 to 18 years. Each trial contributed to at least one meta-analysis. Trials involved children and adolescents with long-term physical conditions, such as chronic headache (migraine, tension headache, and others), chronic pain conditions (abdominal, musculoskeletal, and others), chronic respiratory illness (asthma, cystic fibrosis, and others), and symptoms of anxiety or depression. Participants were recruited from community settings and hospital clinics in high income countries.For the primary outcome of change in depression symptoms versus any control, there was very low-quality evidence meaning that it could not be determined whether e-health interventions were clearly better than any comparator (SMD -0.06, 95% CI -0.35 to 0.23; five RCTs, 441 participants). For the primary outcome of change in anxiety symptoms versus any comparator, there was very low-quality evidence meaning that it could not be determined whether e-health interventions were clearly better than any comparator (SMD -0.07, 95% CI -0.29 to 0.14; two RCTs, 324 participants). For the primary outcome of treatment acceptability, there was very low-quality evidence that e-health interventions were less acceptable than any comparator (SMD 0.46, 95% CI 0.23 to 0.69; two RCTs, 304 participants).For the secondary outcome of quality of life, there was very low-quality evidence meaning that it could not be determined whether e-health interventions were clearly better than any comparator (SMD -0.83, 95% CI -1.53 to -0.12; one RCT, 34 participants). For the secondary outcome of functioning, there was very low-quality evidence meaning that it could not be determined whether e-health interventions were clearly better than any comparator (SMD -0.08, 95% CI -0.33 to 0.18; three RCTs, 368 participants). For the secondary outcome of status of long-term physical condition, there was very low-quality evidence meaning that it could not be determined whether e-health interventions were clearly better than any comparator (SMD 0.06, 95% CI -0.12 to 0.24; five RCTs, 463 participants).The risk of selection bias was considered low in most trials. However, the risk of bias due to inadequate blinding of participants or outcome assessors was considered unclear or high in all trials. Only one study had a published protocol; two trials had incomplete outcome data. All trials were conducted by the intervention developers, introducing another possible bias. No adverse effects were reported by any authors. At present, the field of e-health interventions for the treatment of anxiety or depression in children and adolescents with long-term physical conditions is limited to five low quality trials. The very low-quality of the evidence means the effects of e-health interventions are uncertain at this time, especially in children aged under 10 years.Although it is too early to recommend e-health interventions for this clinical population, given their growing number, and the global improvement in access to technology, there appears to be room for the development and evaluation of acceptable and effective technologically-based treatments to suit children and adolescents with long-term physical conditions.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 146 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 441 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 <1%
Unknown 439 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 102 23%
Student > Master 76 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 64 15%
Student > Bachelor 51 12%
Researcher 43 10%
Other 104 24%
Unknown 1 <1%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 127 29%
Medicine and Dentistry 112 25%
Psychology 51 12%
Nursing and Health Professions 48 11%
Social Sciences 23 5%
Other 79 18%
Unknown 1 <1%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 93. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 September 2019.
All research outputs
#175,469
of 13,533,907 outputs
Outputs from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#397
of 10,632 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#6,171
of 223,714 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#8
of 174 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,533,907 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 10,632 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 21.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 223,714 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 174 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.