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The Politics of Attachment: Lines of Flight with Bowlby, Deleuze and Guattari

Overview of attention for article published in Theory, Culture & Society, October 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (74th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (62nd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
7 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
9 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
78 Mendeley
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Title
The Politics of Attachment: Lines of Flight with Bowlby, Deleuze and Guattari
Published in
Theory, Culture & Society, October 2015
DOI 10.1177/0263276415605577
Pubmed ID
Authors

Robbie Duschinsky, Monica Greco, Judith Solomon

Abstract

Research on attachment is widely regarded in sociology and feminist scholarship as politically conservative - oriented by a concern to police families, pathologize mothers and emphasize psychological at the expense of socio-economic factors. These critiques have presented attachment theory as constructing biological imperatives to naturalize contingent, social demands. We propose that a more effective critique of the politically conservative uses of attachment theory is offered by engaging with the 'attachment system' at the level of ontology. In developing this argument we draw on Deleuze and Guattari, making use of the common language of ethology which links their ideas to that of attachment theory. The attachment system can and has been reified into an image of the infant returning to their caregiver as an image of familial sufficiency. This has offered ammunition for discourses and institutions which isolate women from health, social and political resources. Yet Deleuze and Guattari can help attachment theory and research to be recognized as a powerful ally for progressive politics, for reflection on the movement of human individuation, and for arguing for the meaningful resourcing of those who care for someone else.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 78 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 3%
Germany 1 1%
Poland 1 1%
Unknown 74 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 23 29%
Student > Master 15 19%
Researcher 8 10%
Unspecified 8 10%
Student > Postgraduate 6 8%
Other 18 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 28 36%
Psychology 27 35%
Unspecified 12 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 4%
Arts and Humanities 3 4%
Other 5 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 August 2019.
All research outputs
#3,381,328
of 13,536,695 outputs
Outputs from Theory, Culture & Society
#292
of 725 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#70,317
of 282,268 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Theory, Culture & Society
#11
of 29 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,536,695 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 74th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 725 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 282,268 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 29 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its contemporaries.