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Retaining the general practitioner workforce in England: what matters to GPs? A cross-sectional study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Family Practice, October 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#13 of 1,617)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
3 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
70 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
43 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
86 Mendeley
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Title
Retaining the general practitioner workforce in England: what matters to GPs? A cross-sectional study
Published in
BMC Family Practice, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12875-015-0363-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jeremy Dale, Rachel Potter, Katherine Owen, Nicholas Parsons, Alba Realpe, Jonathan Leach

Abstract

The general practice (GP) workforce in England is in crisis, reflected in increasing rates of early retirement and intentions to reduce hours of working. This study aimed to investigate underlying factors and how these might be mitigated. GPs in central England were invited to participate in an on-line survey exploring career plans and views and experiences of work-related pressures. Quantitative data were analysed using logistic regression analysis and principal components analysis. Qualitative data were analysed using a thematic framework approach. Of 1,192 GPs who participated, 978 (82.0 %) stated that they intend to leave general practice, take a career break and/or reduce clinical hours of work within the next five years. This included 488 (41.9 %) who intend to leave practice, and almost a quarter (279; 23.2 %) intending to take a career break. Only 67 (5.6 %) planned to increase their hours of clinical work. For participants planning to leave practice, the issues that most influenced intentions were volume and intensity of workload, time spent on "unimportant tasks", introduction of seven-day working and lack of job satisfaction. Four hundred fifty five participants responded to open questions (39128 words in total). The main themes were the cumulative impact of work-related pressures, the changing and growing nature of the workload, and the consequent stress. Reducing workload intensity, workload volume, administrative activities, with increased time for patient care, no out-of-hour commitments, more flexible working conditions and greater clinical autonomy were identified as the most important requirements to address the workforce crisis. In addition, incentive payments, increased pay and protected time for education and training were also rated as important. New models of professionalism and organisational arrangements may be needed to address the issues described here. Without urgent action, the GP workforce crisis in England seems set to worsen.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 70 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 86 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Australia 1 1%
Canada 1 1%
Unknown 84 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 21 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 14%
Researcher 9 10%
Student > Postgraduate 8 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 6%
Other 13 15%
Unknown 18 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 33 38%
Psychology 10 12%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 10%
Business, Management and Accounting 5 6%
Social Sciences 2 2%
Other 10 12%
Unknown 17 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 79. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 December 2018.
All research outputs
#282,905
of 15,918,484 outputs
Outputs from BMC Family Practice
#13
of 1,617 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#7,114
of 286,588 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Family Practice
#2
of 159 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,918,484 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,617 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 286,588 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 159 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.