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Environmental geochemistry of the abandoned Mamut Copper Mine (Sabah) Malaysia

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Geochemistry & Health, November 2016
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Title
Environmental geochemistry of the abandoned Mamut Copper Mine (Sabah) Malaysia
Published in
Environmental Geochemistry & Health, November 2016
DOI 10.1007/s10653-016-9892-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Antony van der Ent, Mansour Edraki

Abstract

The Mamut Copper Mine (MCM) located in Sabah (Malaysia) on Borneo Island was the only Cu-Au mine that operated in the country. During its operation (1975-1999), the mine produced 2.47 Mt of concentrate containing approximately 600,000 t of Cu, 45 t of Au and 294 t of Ag, and generated about 250 Mt of overburden and waste rocks and over 150 Mt of tailings, which were deposited at the 397 ha Lohan tailings storage facility, 15.8 km from the mine and 980 m lower in altitude. The MCM site presents challenges for environmental rehabilitation due to the presence of large volumes of sulphidic minerals wastes, the very high rainfall and the large volume of polluted mine pit water. This indicates that rehabilitation and treatment is costly, as for example, exceedingly large quantities of lime are needed for neutralisation of the acidic mine pit discharge. The MCM site has several unusual geochemical features on account of the concomitant occurrence of acid-forming sulphide porphyry rocks and alkaline serpentinite minerals, and unique biological features because of the very high plant diversity in its immediate surroundings. The site hence provides a valuable opportunity for researching natural acid neutralisation processes and mine rehabilitation in tropical areas. Today, the MCM site is surrounded by protected nature reserves (Kinabalu Park, a World Heritage Site, and Bukit Hampuan, a Class I Forest Reserve), and the environmental legacy prevents de-gazetting and inclusion in these protected area in the foreseeable future. This article presents a preliminary geochemical investigation of waste rocks, sediments, secondary precipitates, surface water chemistry and foliar elemental uptake in ferns, and discusses these results in light of their environmental significance for rehabilitation.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 13 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 13 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 3 23%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 2 15%
Student > Master 2 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 15%
Researcher 2 15%
Other 2 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 6 46%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 3 23%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 8%
Unspecified 1 8%
Engineering 1 8%
Other 1 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 August 2018.
All research outputs
#10,007,871
of 12,504,607 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Geochemistry & Health
#265
of 337 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#205,368
of 275,003 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Geochemistry & Health
#41
of 45 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,504,607 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 337 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.6. This one is in the 12th percentile – i.e., 12% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 45 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 4th percentile – i.e., 4% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.