↓ Skip to main content

Rotavirus-associated mild encephalopathy with a reversible splenial lesion (MERS)—case report and review of the literature

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, October 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
14 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
46 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Rotavirus-associated mild encephalopathy with a reversible splenial lesion (MERS)—case report and review of the literature
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12879-015-1192-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Konstantinos Karampatsas, Christina Spyridou, Ian R. Morrison, Cheuk Y. W. Tong, Andrew J. Prendergast

Abstract

Rotavirus is the most common cause of severe gastroenteritis in children under the age of 5 years worldwide. It is well recognised that rotavirus can cause signs and symptoms beyond the gastrointestinal tract, including neurological manifestations such as encephalopathy. Mild encephalopathy with a reversible splenial lesion (MERS) is a clinico-radiological syndrome that has been associated with rotavirus. We report a case of a 4-year-old boy with clinically mild encephalopathy, who had an isolated splenial lesion in the corpus callosum on neuroimaging, and rotavirus RNA detected in faeces. We use this case as an opportunity to review the literature on rotavirus-associated MERS. A previously healthy 4-year-old boy presented with a 2-day history of vomiting, diarrhoea, and fever, complicated by reduced level of consciousness. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed a marked hyperintensity in the splenium of the corpus callosum on T2 and diffusion-weighted images. Rotavirus genome was detected by polymerase chain reaction in a stool specimen, but not in the cerebrospinal fluid. The genotype was identified as G1P8. His clinical condition improved with gradual resolution of his symptoms. No neurological complications were evident upon discharge and the patient had no recurring symptoms or significant residual defects when followed up 2 months later. MERS is a novel clinic-radiological syndrome first described in Japan. A transient splenial lesion with reduced diffusion that appears as a high signal intensity in diffusion-weighted MRI is the main diagnostic feature. Rotavirus is one of the most common agents associated with MERS, although to our knowledge only one previous case has been reported from Europe. The majority of patients appear to achieve full recovery following rotavirus-associated MERS, irrespective of treatment. This case, together with other published reports, supports the hypothesis that rotavirus-associated MERS is unlikely to be the result of direct viral invasion of the CNS. It has been suggested that MERS may be caused by intra-myelinic axonal oedema or local inflammatory cell infiltration; however, the pathogenesis remains incompletely understood.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 46 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Slovakia 1 2%
Unknown 45 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 10 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 15%
Student > Postgraduate 5 11%
Student > Master 4 9%
Student > Bachelor 4 9%
Other 12 26%
Unknown 4 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 24 52%
Neuroscience 4 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 4%
Other 4 9%
Unknown 7 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 October 2015.
All research outputs
#3,020,404
of 6,405,271 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#1,655
of 3,026 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#104,725
of 197,355 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#91
of 160 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,405,271 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,026 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.3. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 197,355 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 160 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.