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Breast Cancer by Age at Diagnosis in the Gharbiah, Egypt, Population-Based Registry Compared to the United States Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program, 2004-2008.

Overview of attention for article published in BioMed Research International, January 2015
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Title
Breast Cancer by Age at Diagnosis in the Gharbiah, Egypt, Population-Based Registry Compared to the United States Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program, 2004-2008.
Published in
BioMed Research International, January 2015
DOI 10.1155/2015/381574
Pubmed ID
Authors

Schlichting, Jennifer A, Soliman, Amr S, Schairer, Catherine, Harford, Joe B, Hablas, Ahmed, Ramadan, Mohamed, Seifeldin, Ibrahim, Merajver, Sofia D

Abstract

Objective. Although breast cancers (BCs) in young women often display more aggressive features, younger women are generally not screened for early detection. It is important to understand the characteristics of young onset breast cancer to increase awareness in this population. This analysis includes all ages, with emphasis placed on younger onset BC in Egypt as compared to the United States. Methods. BC cases in the Gharbiah cancer registry (GCR), Egypt, were compared to those in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. This analysis included 3,819 cases from the GCR and 273,019 from SEER diagnosed 2004-2008. Results. GCR cases were diagnosed at later stages, with <5% diagnosed at Stage I and 12% diagnosed at Stage IV. 48% of all SEER cases were diagnosed at Stage I, dropping to 30% among those ≤40. Significant differences in age, tumor grade, hormone receptor status, histology, and stage exist between GCR and SEER BCs. After adjustment, GCR cases were nearly 45 times more likely to be diagnosed at stage III and 16 times more likely to be diagnosed at stage IV than SEER cases. Conclusions. Future research should examine ways to increase literacy about early detection and prompt therapy in young cases.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 34 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Egypt 1 3%
Unknown 33 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 13 38%
Unspecified 5 15%
Student > Bachelor 4 12%
Other 2 6%
Professor 2 6%
Other 8 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 20 59%
Unspecified 5 15%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 6%
Psychology 2 6%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 3%
Other 4 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 October 2015.
All research outputs
#5,456,706
of 6,405,271 outputs
Outputs from BioMed Research International
#2,547
of 3,758 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#154,986
of 197,359 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BioMed Research International
#274
of 389 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,405,271 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,758 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.6. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 389 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.