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Applying systematic review search methods to the grey literature: a case study examining guidelines for school-based breakfast programs in Canada

Overview of attention for article published in Systematic Reviews, October 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#28 of 1,413)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
2 policy sources
twitter
147 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
122 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
294 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
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Title
Applying systematic review search methods to the grey literature: a case study examining guidelines for school-based breakfast programs in Canada
Published in
Systematic Reviews, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13643-015-0125-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Katelyn Godin, Jackie Stapleton, Sharon I. Kirkpatrick, Rhona M. Hanning, Scott T. Leatherdale

Abstract

Grey literature is an important source of information for large-scale review syntheses. However, there are many characteristics of grey literature that make it difficult to search systematically. Further, there is no 'gold standard' for rigorous systematic grey literature search methods and few resources on how to conduct this type of search. This paper describes systematic review search methods that were developed and applied to complete a case study systematic review of grey literature that examined guidelines for school-based breakfast programs in Canada. A grey literature search plan was developed to incorporate four different searching strategies: (1) grey literature databases, (2) customized Google search engines, (3) targeted websites, and (4) consultation with contact experts. These complementary strategies were used to minimize the risk of omitting relevant sources. Since abstracts are often unavailable in grey literature documents, items' abstracts, executive summaries, or table of contents (whichever was available) were screened. Screening of publications' full-text followed. Data were extracted on the organization, year published, who they were developed by, intended audience, goal/objectives of document, sources of evidence/resources cited, meals mentioned in the guidelines, and recommendations for program delivery. The search strategies for identifying and screening publications for inclusion in the case study review was found to be manageable, comprehensive, and intuitive when applied in practice. The four search strategies of the grey literature search plan yielded 302 potentially relevant items for screening. Following the screening process, 15 publications that met all eligibility criteria remained and were included in the case study systematic review. The high-level findings of the case study systematic review are briefly described. This article demonstrated a feasible and seemingly robust method for applying systematic search strategies to identify web-based resources in the grey literature. The search strategy we developed and tested is amenable to adaptation to identify other types of grey literature from other disciplines and answering a wide range of research questions. This method should be further adapted and tested in future research syntheses.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 147 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 294 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Unknown 291 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 70 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 38 13%
Researcher 31 11%
Librarian 29 10%
Student > Bachelor 28 10%
Other 64 22%
Unknown 34 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 61 21%
Social Sciences 50 17%
Nursing and Health Professions 42 14%
Psychology 21 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 14 5%
Other 55 19%
Unknown 51 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 93. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 January 2020.
All research outputs
#235,517
of 15,922,938 outputs
Outputs from Systematic Reviews
#28
of 1,413 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#5,928
of 287,165 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Systematic Reviews
#5
of 141 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,922,938 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,413 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 287,165 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 141 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.