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Plasmodium vivax in vitro continuous culture: the spoke in the wheel

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, August 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (51st percentile)

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters

Citations

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13 Dimensions

Readers on

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63 Mendeley
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Title
Plasmodium vivax in vitro continuous culture: the spoke in the wheel
Published in
Malaria Journal, August 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12936-018-2456-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Maritza Bermúdez, Darwin Andrés Moreno-Pérez, Gabriela Arévalo-Pinzón, Hernando Curtidor, Manuel Alfonso Patarroyo

Abstract

Understanding the life cycle of Plasmodium vivax is fundamental for developing strategies aimed at controlling and eliminating this parasitic species. Although advances in omic sciences and high-throughput techniques in recent years have enabled the identification and characterization of proteins which might be participating in P. vivax invasion of target cells, exclusive parasite tropism for invading reticulocytes has become the main obstacle in maintaining a continuous culture for this species. Such advance that would help in defining each parasite protein's function in the complex process of P. vivax invasion, in addition to evaluating new therapeutic agents, is still a dream. Advances related to maintenance, culture medium supplements and the use of different sources of reticulocytes and parasites (strains and isolates) have been made regarding the development of an in vitro culture for P. vivax; however, only some cultures having few replication cycles have been obtained to date, meaning that this parasite's maintenance goes beyond the technical components involved. Although it is still not yet clear which molecular mechanisms P. vivax prefers for invading young CD71+ reticulocytes [early maturation stages (I-II-III)], changes related to membrane proteins remodelling of such cells could form part of the explanation. The most relevant aspects regarding P. vivax in vitro culture and host cell characteristics have been analysed in this review to explain possible reasons why the species' continuous in vitro culture is so difficult to standardize. Some alternatives for P. vivax in vitro culture have also been described.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 63 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 63 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 14 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 16%
Researcher 7 11%
Student > Bachelor 7 11%
Student > Postgraduate 5 8%
Other 11 17%
Unknown 9 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 14 22%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 14 22%
Immunology and Microbiology 12 19%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 6%
Chemistry 2 3%
Other 5 8%
Unknown 12 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 November 2018.
All research outputs
#8,462,227
of 15,384,379 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#2,682
of 4,373 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#128,920
of 277,403 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,384,379 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,373 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 277,403 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them