↓ Skip to main content

Ancient low–molecular-weight organic acids in permafrost fuel rapid carbon dioxide production upon thaw

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, October 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (88th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
15 news outlets
blogs
3 blogs
twitter
12 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Readers on

mendeley
166 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Ancient low–molecular-weight organic acids in permafrost fuel rapid carbon dioxide production upon thaw
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, October 2015
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1511705112
Pubmed ID
Authors

Travis W. Drake, Kimberly P. Wickland, Robert G. M. Spencer, Diane M. McKnight, Robert G. Striegl

Abstract

Northern permafrost soils store a vast reservoir of carbon, nearly twice that of the present atmosphere. Current and projected climate warming threatens widespread thaw of these frozen, organic carbon (OC)-rich soils. Upon thaw, mobilized permafrost OC in dissolved and particulate forms can enter streams and rivers, which are important processors of OC and conduits for carbon dioxide (CO2) to the atmosphere. Here, we demonstrate that ancient dissolved organic carbon (DOC) leached from 35,800 y B.P. permafrost soils is rapidly mineralized to CO2. During 200-h experiments in a novel high-temporal-resolution bioreactor, DOC concentration decreased by an average of 53%, fueling a more than sevenfold increase in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) concentration. Eighty-seven percent of the DOC loss to microbial uptake was derived from the low-molecular-weight (LMW) organic acids acetate and butyrate. To our knowledge, our study is the first to directly quantify high CO2 production rates from permafrost-derived LMW DOC mineralization. The observed DOC loss rates are among the highest reported for permafrost carbon and demonstrate the potential importance of LMW DOC in driving the rapid metabolism of Pleistocene-age permafrost carbon upon thaw and the outgassing of CO2 to the atmosphere by soils and nearby inland waters.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 12 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 166 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 2%
Canada 2 1%
Austria 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Cuba 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Unknown 156 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 45 27%
Researcher 35 21%
Student > Master 28 17%
Professor 12 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 5%
Other 22 13%
Unknown 16 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 68 41%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 39 23%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 23 14%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 2%
Chemistry 3 2%
Other 4 2%
Unknown 25 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 136. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 June 2019.
All research outputs
#138,572
of 15,289,603 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#3,085
of 84,730 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#3,637
of 286,314 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#103
of 931 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,289,603 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 84,730 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 27.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 286,314 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 931 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.