↓ Skip to main content

Ubiquity of polystyrene digestion and biodegradation within yellow mealworms, larvae of Tenebrio molitor Linnaeus (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae)

Overview of attention for article published in Chemosphere, December 2018
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (73rd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
11 tweeters

Readers on

mendeley
36 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Ubiquity of polystyrene digestion and biodegradation within yellow mealworms, larvae of Tenebrio molitor Linnaeus (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae)
Published in
Chemosphere, December 2018
DOI 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2018.08.078
Pubmed ID
Authors

Shan-Shan Yang, Wei-Min Wu, Anja M. Brandon, Han-Qing Fan, Joseph P. Receveur, Yiran Li, Zhi-Yue Wang, Rui Fan, Rebecca L. McClellan, Shu-Hong Gao, Daliang Ning, Debra H. Phillips, Bo-Yu Peng, Hongtao Wang, Shen-Yang Cai, Ping Li, Wei-Wei Cai, Ling-Yun Ding, Jun Yang, Min Zheng, Jie Ren, Ya-Lei Zhang, Jie Gao, Defeng Xing, Nan-Qi Ren, Robert M. Waymouth, Jizhong Zhou, Hu-Chun Tao, Christine J. Picard, Mark Eric Benbow, Craig S. Criddle

Abstract

Academics researchers and "citizen scientists" from 22 countries confirmed that yellow mealworms, the larvae of Tenebrio molitor Linnaeus, can survive by eating polystyrene (PS) foam. More detailed assessments of this capability for mealworms were carried out by12 sources: five from the USA, six from China, and one from Northern Ireland. All of these mealworms digested PS foam. PS mass decreased and depolymerization was observed, with appearance of lower molecular weight residuals and functional groups indicative of oxidative transformations in extracts from the frass (insect excrement). An addition of gentamycin (30 mg g-1), a bactericidal antibiotic, inhibited depolymerization, implicating the gut microbiome in the biodegradation process. Microbial community analyses demonstrated significant taxonomic shifts for mealworms fed diets of PS plus bran and PS alone. The results indicate that mealworms from diverse locations eat and metabolize PS and support the hypothesis that this capacity is independent of the geographic origin of the mealworms, and is likely ubiquitous to members of this species.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 11 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 36 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 36 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 10 28%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 17%
Unspecified 5 14%
Student > Master 3 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 8%
Other 9 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 25%
Unspecified 8 22%
Chemistry 8 22%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 14%
Environmental Science 3 8%
Other 3 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 August 2018.
All research outputs
#2,017,880
of 12,189,304 outputs
Outputs from Chemosphere
#394
of 5,296 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#65,783
of 248,440 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Chemosphere
#7
of 106 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,189,304 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 83rd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,296 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 248,440 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 106 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.