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Cytonuclear discordance in the Florida Everglades invasive Burmese python (Python bivittatu s) population reveals possible hybridization with the Indian python (P. molurus )

Overview of attention for article published in Ecology and Evolution, August 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#8 of 5,673)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
54 news outlets
blogs
3 blogs
twitter
9 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages
googleplus
2 Google+ users

Citations

dimensions_citation
4 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
47 Mendeley
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Title
Cytonuclear discordance in the Florida Everglades invasive Burmese python (Python bivittatu s) population reveals possible hybridization with the Indian python (P. molurus )
Published in
Ecology and Evolution, August 2018
DOI 10.1002/ece3.4423
Pubmed ID
Authors

Margaret E. Hunter, Nathan A. Johnson, Brian J. Smith, Michelle C. Davis, John S. S. Butterfield, Ray W. Snow, Kristen M. Hart

Abstract

The invasive Burmese python (Python bivittatus) has been reproducing in the Florida Everglades since the 1980s. These giant constrictor snakes have caused a precipitous decline in small mammal populations in southern Florida following escapes or releases from the commercial pet trade. To better understand the invasion pathway and genetic composition of the population, two mitochondrial (mtDNA) loci across 1,398 base pairs were sequenced on 426 snakes and 22 microsatellites were assessed on 389 snakes. Concatenated mtDNA sequences produced six haplotypes with an average nucleotide and haplotype diversity of π = 0.002 and h = 0.097, respectively. Samples collected in Florida from morphologically identified P. bivittatus snakes were similar to published cytochrome oxidase 1 and cytochrome b sequences from both P. bivittatus and Python molurus and were highly divergent (genetic distances of 5.4% and 4.3%, respectively). The average number of microsatellite alleles and expected heterozygosity were NA = 5.50 and HE = 0.60, respectively. Nuclear Bayesian assignment tests supported two genetically distinct groups and an admixed group, not geographically differentiated. The effective population size (NE = 315.1) was lower than expected for a population this large, but reflected the low genetic diversity overall. The patterns of genetic diversity between mtDNA and microsatellites were disparate, indicating nuclear introgression of separate mtDNA lineages corresponding to cytonuclear discordance. The introgression likely occurred prior to the invasion, but genetic information on the native range and commercial trade is needed for verification. Our finding that the Florida python population is comprised of distinct lineages suggests greater standing variation for adaptation and the potential for broader areas of suitable habitat in the invaded range.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 47 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 47 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 9 19%
Student > Bachelor 7 15%
Researcher 6 13%
Professor 5 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 9%
Other 7 15%
Unknown 9 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 14 30%
Environmental Science 8 17%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 15%
Arts and Humanities 4 9%
Chemistry 2 4%
Other 3 6%
Unknown 9 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 454. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 October 2018.
All research outputs
#32,594
of 17,630,293 outputs
Outputs from Ecology and Evolution
#8
of 5,673 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#946
of 284,832 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Ecology and Evolution
#1
of 207 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,630,293 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,673 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 284,832 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 207 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.