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Egg-laying sequence influences egg mercury concentrations and egg size in three bird species: Implications for contaminant monitoring programs

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry, March 2016
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (56th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (66th percentile)

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters

Citations

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20 Dimensions

Readers on

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24 Mendeley
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Title
Egg-laying sequence influences egg mercury concentrations and egg size in three bird species: Implications for contaminant monitoring programs
Published in
Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry, March 2016
DOI 10.1002/etc.3291
Pubmed ID
Authors

Joshua T. Ackerman, Collin A. Eagles-Smith, Mark P. Herzog, Julie L. Yee, C. Alex Hartman

Abstract

Bird eggs are commonly used in contaminant monitoring programs and toxicological risk assessments, but intra-clutch variation and sampling methodology could influence interpretability. We examined the influence of egg laying sequence on egg mercury concentrations and burdens in American avocets, black-necked stilts, and Forster's terns. The average decline in mercury concentrations between the first and last egg laid was 33% for stilts, 22% for terns, and 11% for avocets, and most of this decline occurred between the first and second eggs laid (24% for stilts, 18% for terns, and 9% for avocets). Trends in egg size with egg laying order were inconsistent among species and overall differences in egg volume, mass, length, and width were <3%. We summarized the literature and, among 17 species studied, mercury concentrations generally declined by 16% between the first and second eggs laid. Despite the strong effect of egg laying sequence, most of the variance in egg mercury concentrations still occurred among clutches (75%-91%) rather than within clutches (9%-25%). Using simulations, we determined that to accurately estimate a population's mean egg mercury concentration using only a single random egg from a subset of nests, it would require sampling >60 nests to represent a large population (10% accuracy) or ≥14 nests to represent a small colony that contained <100 nests (20% accuracy). This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 24 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 4%
United States 1 4%
Unknown 22 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 7 29%
Student > Master 6 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 17%
Student > Bachelor 3 13%
Professor 2 8%
Other 2 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 38%
Environmental Science 7 29%
Unspecified 1 4%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 4%
Mathematics 1 4%
Other 2 8%
Unknown 3 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 November 2015.
All research outputs
#8,715,112
of 15,827,240 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry
#2,827
of 4,585 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#120,863
of 287,397 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry
#31
of 92 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,827,240 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,585 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.7. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 287,397 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 92 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.