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Reconstruction of human subsistence and husbandry strategies from the Iberian Early Neolithic: A stable isotope approach

Overview of attention for article published in American Journal of Physical Anthropology, August 2018
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Title
Reconstruction of human subsistence and husbandry strategies from the Iberian Early Neolithic: A stable isotope approach
Published in
American Journal of Physical Anthropology, August 2018
DOI 10.1002/ajpa.23622
Pubmed ID
Authors

Vanessa Villalba-Mouco, Pilar Utrilla, Rafael Laborda, José Ignacio Lorenzo, Cristina Martínez-Labarga, Domingo C. Salazar-García

Abstract

The Early Neolithic involved an important social and economic shift that can be tested not only with the material culture, but also through biomolecular approaches. The Iberian Peninsula presents few Early Neolithic sites where fauna and humans can be analyzed together from an isotopic perspective. Here we present an isotopic study on the site of Cueva de Chaves as an example for understanding the dietary and economical changes that took place during Early Neolithic in Iberia. Here we apply carbon and nitrogen stable isotope analysis to bone collagen from 4 humans and 64 faunal samples from 14 different species. The large dataset belongs to the same unique chrono-cultural context secured by 20 radiocarbon dates. Three direct new radiocarbon dates were carried out on the human remains analyzed. Faunal isotope values show no significant differences between wild and domestic herbivores, although the latter have more homogeneous values. Domestic pigs, potentially considered omnivorous, also show signatures of a herbivore diet. Human isotopic results show a diet mainly based on terrestrial C3 resources and possibly high meat consumption. The only individual found buried with a special funerary treatment presents a slightly different protein intake, when taking into account the long contemporaneous baseline analyzed. Similar values between wild and domestic species could be the result of common feeding resources and/or grazing on the same parts of the landscape. The herbivore diet seen amongst domestic pigs rules out feeding on household leftovers. High meat consumption by humans would support the hypothesis of the existence of a specialized animal husbandry management community in which agriculture was not intensively developed. Our results suggest that the development of agricultural practices and animal husbandry were not necessarily associated together in the early stages of the Western Mediterranean Neolithic.

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 13 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 13 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 3 23%
Student > Master 3 23%
Researcher 3 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 15%
Professor > Associate Professor 1 8%
Other 1 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 5 38%
Arts and Humanities 3 23%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 8%
Environmental Science 1 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 8%
Other 2 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 August 2018.
All research outputs
#10,023,858
of 12,526,930 outputs
Outputs from American Journal of Physical Anthropology
#2,088
of 2,436 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#203,728
of 272,550 outputs
Outputs of similar age from American Journal of Physical Anthropology
#41
of 44 outputs
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