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Exploration of the Canyon-Incised Continental Margin of the Northeastern United States Reveals Dynamic Habitats and Diverse Communities

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS ONE, October 2015
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (76th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (76th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
8 tweeters

Citations

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38 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
71 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Exploration of the Canyon-Incised Continental Margin of the Northeastern United States Reveals Dynamic Habitats and Diverse Communities
Published in
PLoS ONE, October 2015
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0139904
Pubmed ID
Authors

Andrea M. Quattrini, Martha S. Nizinski, Jason D. Chaytor, Amanda W. J. Demopoulos, E. Brendan Roark, Scott C. France, Jon A. Moore, Taylor Heyl, Peter J. Auster, Brian Kinlan, Carolyn Ruppel, Kelley P. Elliott, Brian R.C. Kennedy, Elizabeth Lobecker, Adam Skarke, Timothy M. Shank

Abstract

The continental margin off the northeastern United States (NEUS) contains numerous, topographically complex features that increase habitat heterogeneity across the region. However, the majority of these rugged features have never been surveyed, particularly using direct observations. During summer 2013, 31 Remotely-Operated Vehicle (ROV) dives were conducted from 494 to 3271 m depth across a variety of seafloor features to document communities and to infer geological processes that produced such features. The ROV surveyed six broad-scale habitat features, consisting of shelf-breaching canyons, slope-sourced canyons, inter-canyon areas, open-slope/landslide-scar areas, hydrocarbon seeps, and Mytilus Seamount. Four previously unknown chemosynthetic communities dominated by Bathymodiolus mussels were documented. Seafloor methane hydrate was observed at two seep sites. Multivariate analyses indicated that depth and broad-scale habitat significantly influenced megafaunal coral (58 taxa), demersal fish (69 taxa), and decapod crustacean (34 taxa) assemblages. Species richness of fishes and crustaceans significantly declined with depth, while there was no relationship between coral richness and depth. Turnover in assemblage structure occurred on the middle to lower slope at the approximate boundaries of water masses found previously in the region. Coral species richness was also an important variable explaining variation in fish and crustacean assemblages. Coral diversity may serve as an indicator of habitat suitability and variation in available niche diversity for these taxonomic groups. Our surveys added 24 putative coral species and three fishes to the known regional fauna, including the black coral Telopathes magna, the octocoral Metallogorgia melanotrichos and the fishes Gaidropsarus argentatus, Guttigadus latifrons, and Lepidion guentheri. Marine litter was observed on 81% of the dives, with at least 12 coral colonies entangled in debris. While initial exploration revealed the NEUS region to be both geologically dynamic and biologically diverse, further research into the abiotic conditions and the biotic interactions that influence species abundance and distribution is needed.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 71 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 1%
India 1 1%
Unknown 69 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 22 31%
Researcher 14 20%
Student > Master 13 18%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 7%
Other 3 4%
Other 5 7%
Unknown 9 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 31 44%
Environmental Science 11 15%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 11 15%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 7%
Psychology 1 1%
Other 1 1%
Unknown 11 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 November 2015.
All research outputs
#3,557,735
of 15,227,069 outputs
Outputs from PLoS ONE
#41,495
of 153,887 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#65,815
of 285,983 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS ONE
#1,294
of 5,414 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,227,069 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 76th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 153,887 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 285,983 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5,414 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.