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Importance of the Colmation Layer in the Transport and Removal of Cyanobacteria, Viruses, and Dissolved Organic Carbon during Natural Lake-Bank Filtration

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Environmental Quality, September 2015
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Title
Importance of the Colmation Layer in the Transport and Removal of Cyanobacteria, Viruses, and Dissolved Organic Carbon during Natural Lake-Bank Filtration
Published in
Journal of Environmental Quality, September 2015
DOI 10.2134/jeq2015.03.0151
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ronald W. Harvey, David W. Metge, Denis R. LeBlanc, Jen Underwood, George R. Aiken, Kenna Butler, Timothy D. McCobb, Jay Jasperse

Abstract

This study focused on the importance of the colmation layer in the removal of cyanobacteria, viruses, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) during natural bank filtration. Injection-and-recovery studies were performed at two shallow (0.5 m deep), sandy, near-shore sites at the southern end of Ashumet Pond, a waste-impacted, kettle pond on Cape Cod, MA, that is subject to periodic blooms of cyanobacteria and continuously recharges a sole-source drinking-water aquifer. The experiment involved assessing the transport behaviors of bromide (conservative tracer), sp. IU625 (cyanobacterium, 2.6 ± 0.2 µm), AS-1 (tailed cyanophage, 110 nm long), MS2 (coliphage, 26 nm diameter), and carboxylate-modified microspheres (1.7 µm diameter) introduced to the colmation layer using a bag-and-barrel (Lee-type) seepage meter. The injectate constituents were tracked as they were advected across the pond water-groundwater interface and through the underlying aquifer sediments under natural-gradient conditions past push-point samplers placed at ∼30-cm intervals along a 1.2-m-long, diagonally downward flow path. More than 99% of the microspheres, IU625, MS2, AS-1, and ∼44% of the pond DOC were removed in the colmation layer (upper 25 cm of poorly sorted bottom sediments) at two test locations characterized by dissimilar seepage rates (1.7 vs. 0.26 m d). Retention profiles in recovered core material indicated that >82% of the attached IU625 were in the top 3 cm of bottom sediments. The colmation layer was also responsible for rapid changes in the character of the DOC and was more effective (by three orders of magnitude) at removing microspheres than was the underlying 20-cm-thick segment of sediment.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 20 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 20 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 25%
Researcher 4 20%
Student > Master 4 20%
Other 3 15%
Student > Bachelor 1 5%
Other 2 10%
Unknown 1 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Earth and Planetary Sciences 5 25%
Engineering 4 20%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 15%
Environmental Science 2 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 5%
Other 2 10%
Unknown 3 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 October 2015.
All research outputs
#4,810,192
of 6,504,996 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Environmental Quality
#333
of 528 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#141,720
of 206,856 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Environmental Quality
#31
of 57 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,504,996 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 528 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.4. This one is in the 8th percentile – i.e., 8% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 206,856 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 57 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 3rd percentile – i.e., 3% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.