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Reference gene stability of a synanthropic fly, Chrysomya megacephala

Overview of attention for article published in Parasites & Vectors, October 2015
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Title
Reference gene stability of a synanthropic fly, Chrysomya megacephala
Published in
Parasites & Vectors, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13071-015-1175-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Xiaoyun Wang, Mei Xiong, Jialu Wang, Chaoliang Lei, Fen Zhu

Abstract

Stable reference genes are essential for accurate normalization in gene expression studies with reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). A synanthropic fly, Chrysomya megacephala, is a well known medical vector and forensic indicator. Unfortunately, previous studies did not look at the stability of reference genes used in C. megacephala. In this study, the expression level of Actin, ribosomal protein L8 (Rpl8), glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), elongation factor 1α (EF1), α-tubulin (α-TUB), β-tubulin (β-TUB), TATA binding box (TBP), 18S rRNA (18S) and ribosomal protein S7 (Rps7) were evaluated for their stability using online software RefFinder, which combines the normal software of the ΔCt method, BestKeeper, Normfinder, and geNorm. Moreover the number of suitable reference gene pairs was also suggested by Excel-based geNorm. The expression levels of these reference genes were evaluated under different experimental conditions with special perspectives of forensic applications: developmental stages (eggs, first, second and third instar larvae, pupae and adults); food sources of larvae (pork, fish and chicken); feeding larvae with drugs (untreated control, Estazolam and Marvelon); feeding larvae with heavy metals (untreated control, cadmium and zinc); tissues of adults (head, thorax, abdomen, legs and wings). According to RefFinder, EF1 was the most suitable reference gene of developmental stages, food and tissues; 18S and GAPDH were the most suitable reference genes for drugs and heavy metals, respectively, which could be widely used for quantification of target gene expression with qPCR in C. megacephala. Suitable reference gene pairs were also suggested by geNorm. This fundamental but vital work should facilitate the gene studies of related biological processes and deepen the understanding in physiology, toxicology, and especially medical and forensic entomology of C. megacephala.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 18 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 18 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 5 28%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 22%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 11%
Student > Postgraduate 1 6%
Other 1 6%
Other 5 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 39%
Unspecified 7 39%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 11%
Environmental Science 1 6%
Neuroscience 1 6%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 October 2015.
All research outputs
#4,810,206
of 6,504,996 outputs
Outputs from Parasites & Vectors
#1,314
of 1,835 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#141,718
of 206,856 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Parasites & Vectors
#133
of 181 outputs
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