↓ Skip to main content

Functional significance of dinitrogen fixation in sustaining coral productivity under oligotrophic conditions

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, October 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
6 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
32 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
78 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Functional significance of dinitrogen fixation in sustaining coral productivity under oligotrophic conditions
Published in
Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, October 2015
DOI 10.1098/rspb.2015.2257
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ulisse Cardini, Vanessa N. Bednarz, Malik S. Naumann, Nanne van Hoytema, Laura Rix, Rachel A. Foster, Mamoon M. D. Al-Rshaidat, Christian Wild

Abstract

Functional traits define species by their ecological role in the ecosystem. Animals themselves are host-microbe ecosystems (holobionts), and the application of ecophysiological approaches can help to understand their functioning. In hard coral holobionts, communities of dinitrogen (N2)-fixing prokaryotes (diazotrophs) may contribute a functional trait by providing bioavailable nitrogen (N) that could sustain coral productivity under oligotrophic conditions. This study quantified N2 fixation by diazotrophs associated with four genera of hermatypic corals on a northern Red Sea fringing reef exposed to high seasonality. We found N2 fixation activity to be 5- to 10-fold higher in summer, when inorganic nutrient concentrations were lowest and water temperature and light availability highest. Concurrently, coral gross primary productivity remained stable despite lower Symbiodinium densities and tissue chlorophyll a contents. In contrast, chlorophyll a content per Symbiodinium cell increased from spring to summer, suggesting that algal cells overcame limitation of N, an essential element for chlorophyll synthesis. In fact, N2 fixation was positively correlated with coral productivity in summer, when its contribution was estimated to meet 11% of the Symbiodinium N requirements. These results provide evidence of an important functional role of diazotrophs in sustaining coral productivity when alternative external N sources are scarce.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 78 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 1%
Australia 1 1%
Saudi Arabia 1 1%
Unknown 75 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 29 37%
Researcher 17 22%
Student > Bachelor 9 12%
Student > Master 8 10%
Unspecified 7 9%
Other 8 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 35 45%
Environmental Science 21 27%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 10 13%
Unspecified 8 10%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 3%
Other 2 3%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 14. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 November 2015.
All research outputs
#971,403
of 12,367,173 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#2,680
of 7,350 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#29,544
of 266,457 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#70
of 130 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,367,173 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,350 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 26.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,457 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 130 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.