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Impact of an Ivermectin Mass Drug Administration on Scabies Prevalence in a Remote Australian Aboriginal Community

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, October 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (77th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (63rd percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
4 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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62 Dimensions

Readers on

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86 Mendeley
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Title
Impact of an Ivermectin Mass Drug Administration on Scabies Prevalence in a Remote Australian Aboriginal Community
Published in
PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, October 2015
DOI 10.1371/journal.pntd.0004151
Pubmed ID
Authors

Thérèse M. Kearns, Richard Speare, Allen C. Cheng, James McCarthy, Jonathan R. Carapetis, Deborah C. Holt, Bart J. Currie, Wendy Page, Jennifer Shield, Roslyn Gundjirryirr, Leanne Bundhala, Eddie Mulholland, Mark Chatfield, Ross M. Andrews

Abstract

Scabies is endemic in many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, with 69% of infants infected in the first year of life. We report the outcomes against scabies of two oral ivermectin mass drug administrations (MDAs) delivered 12 months apart in a remote Australian Aboriginal community. Utilizing a before and after study design, we measured scabies prevalence through population census with sequential MDAs at baseline and month 12. Surveys at months 6 and 18 determined disease acquisition and treatment failures. Scabies infestations were diagnosed clinically with additional laboratory investigations for crusted scabies. Non-pregnant participants weighing ≥15 kg were administered a single 200 μg/kg ivermectin dose, repeated after 2-3 weeks if scabies was diagnosed, others followed a standard alternative algorithm. We saw >1000 participants at each population census. Scabies prevalence fell from 4% at baseline to 1% at month 6. Prevalence rose to 9% at month 12 amongst the baseline cohort in association with an identified exposure to a presumptive crusted scabies case with a higher prevalence of 14% amongst new entries to the cohort. At month 18, scabies prevalence fell to 2%. Scabies acquisitions six months after each MDA were 1% and 2% whilst treatment failures were 6% and 5% respectively. Scabies prevalence reduced in the six months after each MDA with a low risk of acquisition (1-2%). However, in a setting where living conditions are conducive to high scabies transmissibility, exposure to presumptive crusted scabies and population mobility, a sustained reduction in prevalence was not achieved. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trial Register (ACTRN-12609000654257).

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 86 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Australia 2 2%
Unknown 84 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 15 17%
Student > Bachelor 9 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 9%
Researcher 7 8%
Other 7 8%
Other 17 20%
Unknown 23 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 26 30%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 6%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 4 5%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 3%
Other 14 16%
Unknown 28 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 April 2022.
All research outputs
#4,166,703
of 21,035,197 outputs
Outputs from PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases
#2,902
of 8,255 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#67,189
of 301,337 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases
#72
of 198 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,035,197 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 80th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,255 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 301,337 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 198 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.